Friday, February 24, 2017

Tao Te Ching, Chapter 11


Dao De Jing, Laozi
Chapter 11




"Thirty spokes unite in a nave, but the nothingness in the hub
Gives to the wheel its usefulness, for thereupon it goes round;
The potter kneads the clay as he works, with many a twist and rub,
But in the nothingness within, the vessel's use is found;
Doors and windows cut in the walls thereby a room will make,
But in its nothingness is found the room' s utility;
So the profit of existences is only for the sake
Of non-existences, where all the use is found to be."
-  Translated by Isaac Winter Heysinger, 1903, Chapter 11 


"Thirty spokes share one hub.
Adapt the nothing therein to the purpose in hand, and you will have the use of the cart.
Knead clay in order to make a vessel.
Adapt the nothing therein to the purpose in hand, and you will have the use of the vessel.
Cut out doors and windows in order to make a room.
Adapt the nothing therein to the purpose in hand, and you will have the use of the room.
Thus what we gain is Something, yet it is by virtue of Nothing that this can be put to use."
-  Translated by D. C. Lau, 1963, Chapter 11 



"Thirty spokes share one hub.
It is just the space (the Nothingness) between them
That makes a cart function as a cart.
Knead clay to make a vessel
And you find within it the space
That makes a vessel as a vessel.
To build a house with doors and windows
And you find within them the space
That makes a house function as a house.
Hence the Being (substance) can provide a condition
Under which usefulness is found,
But the Nothingness (space) is the usefulness itself."
-  Translated by Gu Zengkun, Chapter 11 



"Thirty spokes surround one nave, the usefulness of the wheel is always in that empty innermost.
You fashion clay to make a bowl, the usefulness of the bowl is always in that empty innermost.
You cut out doors and windows to make a house, their usefulness to a house is always in their empty space.
Therefore profit comes from external form, but usefulness comes from the empty innermost."
-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 11 


"Although the wheel has thirty spokes its utility lies in the emptiness of the hub.
The jar is made by kneading clay, but its usefulness consists in its capacity.
A room is made by cutting out windows and doors through the walls, but the space the walls contain measures the room's value.
In the same way matter is necessary to form, but the value of reality lies in its immateriality.
Or thus: a material body is necessary to existence, but the value of a life is measured by its immaterial soul."
-  Translated by Dwight Goddard and Henri Borel, 1919, Chapter 11



"Thirty spokes will converge
In the hub of a wheel;
But the use of the cart
Will depend on the part
Of the hub that is void.
With a wall all around
A clay bowl is molded;
But the use of the bowl
Will depend on the part
Of the bowl that is void.
Cut out windows and doors
In the house as you build;
But the use of the house
Will depend on the space
In the walls that is void.
So advantage is had
From whatever is there;
But usefulness rises
From whatever is not."
-  Translated by Raymond Blackney, 1955, Chapter 11   



"Treinta rayos convergen en el medio,
pero el vacío mediano
hace andar al carro.
 

 Se modela la arcilla para hacer jarrones
     con ella,
pero de su vacío interno
depende su utilización.

Una casa está abierta con puertas y ventanas,
otra vez el vacío
permite que se habite en ella.

El Ser da posibilidades,
sólo se utilizan a través del no-ser."
-  Translated by Alba, 1998, Tao Te Ching, Capítulo 11 


"Though thirty spokes may be joined in one hub, the utility of the carriage lies in what is not there.
Though clay may be moulded into a vase, the utility of the vase lies in what is not there
Though doors and windows may be cut to make a house, the utility of the house lies in what is not there.
Therefore, taking advantage of what is, we recognize the utility of what is not."
-  Translated by Jan J. L. Duyvendak, 1954, Chapter 11 



"Thirty spokes share the hub of a wheel;
 yet it is its center that makes it useful.
 You can mould clay into a vessel;
 yet, it is its emptiness that makes it useful.
 Cut doors and windows from the walls of a house;
 but the ultimate use of the house
 will depend on that part where nothing exists.
 Therefore, something is shaped into what is;
 but its usefulness comes from what is not."
 -  Translated by Kari Hohne, 2009, Chapter 11 




A typical webpage created by Mike Garofalo for each one of the 81 Chapters (Verses, Sections) of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) includes 25 different English language translations or interpolations for that Chapter, 5 Spanish language translations for that Chapter, the Chinese characters for that Chapter, the Wade-Giles and Hanyu Pinyin transliterations (Romanization) of the Mandarin Chinese words for that Chapter, and 2 German and 1 French translation of that Chapter.  Each webpage for each one of the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching includes extensive indexing by key words, phrases, and terms for that Chapter in English, Spanish, and the Wade-Giles Romanization.  Each webpage on a Chapter of the Daodejing includes recommended reading in books and websites, a detailed bibliography, some commentary, research leads, translation sources, a Google Translate drop down menu, and other resources for that Chapter. 

  

Chapter 11, Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu.  Complied by Mike Garofalo.  

Chapter and Thematic Index (Concordance) to the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu


English Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index


Spanish Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index


Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices


Taoism: A Selected Reading List


Thursday, February 23, 2017

Home Being Sold

We are very busy with preparing to sell our home in Red Bluff.  It looks very promising that a contract for sale will be finished within a week.  It looks like we will be moving out on April 14, 2017.  So we are busy packing and moving items to a storage container in Red Bluff.  






































Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Dao De Jing Index


Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu circa 200 BCE

Indexes, Selected Translations, Bibliography, Comments, Resources

Compiled by Mike Garofalo. 
Version 5.3, January 1, 2017



A typical webpage created by Mike Garofalo for each one of the 81 Chapters (Verses, Sections) of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) includes over 25 different English language translations or interpolations for that Chapter, 5 Spanish language translations for that Chapter, the Chinese characters for that Chapter, the Wade-Giles and Hanyu Pinyin transliterations (Romanization) of the Mandarin Chinese words for that Chapter, and 2 German and 1 French translation of that Chapter.  Each webpage for each one of the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching includes extensive indexing by key words, phrases, and terms for that Chapter in English, Spanish, and the Wade-Giles Romanization.  Each webpage on a Chapter of the Daodejing includes recommended reading in books and websites, a detailed bibliography, some commentary, research leads, translation sources, a Google Translate drop down menu, and other resources for that Chapter.  


Chapter 1, Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

Chapter and Thematic Index (Concordance) to the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

English Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index

Spanish Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: A Selected Reading List
One Old Daoist Druid's Final Journey   


Best Tao Te Ching Selected Translations





Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Sermon by the Dead Tree



"The smell of the sea hugged the fog in the redwood trees,
All cool and dank, dimly lit and rank with green,
And in shadowed limbs the Stellar jays jabbered free,
And me, standing silently, an alien in this enchanted scene.

From behind the mossy grey stumps
the sounds of footsteps crunching fronds of ferns
caught my suddenly wary mind ...
What?

"Hello, old friend," said Chang San Feng.
"Master Chang, what a surprise," said I.
Master Chang sat on a stump, smiled, and said,

"Can you hear the Blue Dragon singing in the decaying tree;
Or is it the White Tiger roaring in the wilderness of your bright white skull?
No matter!  The answer is in the questioning; don't you Chan men see?

In the red ball flesh of this decaying tree
Sapless woody shards of centuries of seasons
Nourish the new roots of mindfulness sprouting.
Yes, Yes, but how can it be?
The up-surging waves of life sprout forth from the decaying tree,
As sure as sunrise rolling over the deep black sea.
Coming, coming, endlessly coming; waves of Chi.

Tan Qian's raven roosts for 10,000 moons
     in the withered branches of the rotting tree;
     then, one day, the weathered tree falls,
     nobody hearing, soundlessly crashing
     on the forest floor, on some unknown noon.

Over and over, over and over, life bringing death, death bringing life,
Beyond even the miraculous memories of an old Xian like me;
Watching, watching, sequestered from the strife,
Turning my soul away sometimes because I cannot bear to see.

Even minds may die, but Mind is always free
Bounding beyond, beyond, far beyond you and me;
Somehow finding the Possibility Keys
And unlocking the Door out of the Voids of Eternities."

Master Chang somehow, someway,
slowly disappeared into the red brown heart of the decaying tree.

Then the squawk of the jay
opened my mind's eye to the new day -
Namaste."

-  Michael P. Garofalo
   Meetings with Master Chang San Feng 
   Remembering Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park, California






Monday, February 20, 2017

Step Out in the Rain



Day after day, wind and rain, rain and wind. Everything is soaked in our yard and gardens.

"When you look at that nature world it becomes an icon, it becomes a holy picture that speaks of the origins of the world. Almost every mythology sees the origins of life coming out of water.  And, curiously, that's true.  It's amusing that the origin of life out of water is in myths and then again, finally, in science, we find the same thing.  It's exactly so."
- Joseph Campbell, The Hero's Journey, p. 10



"Water is a good servant, but it is a cruel master."
- John Bullein, 1562


Haiku - February


"I am sure it is a great mistake always to know enough to go in when it rains. 
One may keep snug and dry by such knowledge, but one misses a world of loveliness."
- Adeline Knapp


One apple left on a branch of the tree.  It shares the space with a Praying Mantis egg case and a few emerging apple buds.  



A lovely apricot blossom that survived the rain and wind.  A the local almond orchards are in full bloom - white blooms.  



"Coming home
long necked geese–
Canadian-Americans.

A warm rest for
coots, geese, and ducks–
wet rice fields.

The white geese
ascend from the far fields
fleeing popping shotguns.

The honking geese
a quacking cacophony
flapping overhead.

Flocks of white
geese in the light gray fog–
this way and that way."
- Mike Garofalo



Friday, February 17, 2017

Dao De Jing, Chapter 12

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu
Chapter 12



"The five colors combined the human eye will blind;
The five notes in one sound the human ear confound;
The five tastes when they blend the human mouth offend.
Racing and hunting will human hearts turn mad,
Treasures high-prized make human conduct bad.
The holy man attends to the inner and not to the outer.
He abandons the latter and chooses the former."
-  Translated by D. T. Suzuki and Paul Carus, 1913, Chapter 12  



"Color's five hues from the eyes their sight will take;
Music's five notes the ears as deaf can make;
The flavors five deprive the mouth of taste;
The chariot course, and the wild hunting waste
Make mad the mind;
And objects rare and strange,
Sought for,
Men's conduct will to evil change.
Therefore the sage seeks to satisfy the craving of the belly,
and not the insatiable longing of the eyes.
He puts from him the latter, and prefers to seek the former."
-   Translated by James Legge, 1891, Chapter 12  



"The five colors
blind our eyes.
The five notes
deafen our ears.
The five flavors
dull our taste.

Racing, chasing, hunting,
drives people crazy.
Trying to get rich
ties people in knots.

So the wise soul
watches with the inner
not with the outward eye,
letting that go,
keeping this."
-  Translation by Ursula K. Le Guin, 2009, Chapter 12  



"An excess of light blinds the human eye; an excess of noise ruins the ear; an excess of condiments deadens the taste.
The effect of too much horse racing and hunting is bad, and the lure of hidden treasure tempts one to do evil.
Therefore the wise man attends to the inner significance of things and does not concern himself with outward appearances.
Therefore he ignores matter and seeks the spirit."
-  Translated by Dwight Goddard and Henri Borel, 1919, Chapter 12 



"The fives colours confuse the eye,
The fives sounds dull the ear,
The five tastes spoil the palate.
Excess of hunting and chasing
Makes minds go mad.
Products that are hard to get
Impede their owner's movements.
Therefore the Sage
Considers the belly not the eye.
Truly, “he rejects that but takes this”."
-  Translated by Arthur Waley, 1934, Chapter 12 



A typical webpage created by Mike Garofalo for each one of the 81 Chapters (Verses, Sections) of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) includes 25 different English language translations or interpolations for that Chapter, 5 Spanish language translations for that Chapter, the Chinese characters for that Chapter, the Wade-Giles and Hanyu Pinyin transliterations (Romanization) of the Mandarin Chinese words for that Chapter, and 2 German and 1 French translation of that Chapter.  Each webpage for each one of the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching includes extensive indexing by key words, phrases, and terms for that Chapter in English, Spanish, and the Wade-Giles Romanization.  Each webpage on a Chapter of the Daodejing includes recommended reading in books and websites, a detailed bibliography, some commentary, research leads, translation sources, a Google Translate drop down menu, and other resources for that Chapter. 

  
Chapter 12, Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu.  Complied by Mike Garofalo.  

Chapter and Thematic Index (Concordance) to the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu


English Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index


Spanish Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index


Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices


Taoism: A Selected Reading List





Thursday, February 16, 2017

Sit Quietly: Focus and Forget

"Teach us to care and not to care.
Teach us to sit still."
- T.S. Eliot


"You are sitting on the earth and you realize that this earth deserves you and you deserve this earth.  You are there - fully, personally, genuinely."
-  Chogyam Trungpa


"Remain sitting at your table and listen. 
Do not even listen, simply wait, 
be quiet still and solitary. 
The world will freely offer itself 
to you to be unmasked, 
it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy 
at your feet."
-  Franz Kafka



"Sit quietly
focus and forget
rest with the great achievement.
The ancient child asks
"what is the great achievement?"
It is beyond description in any language
it can only be felt intuitively
it can only be expressed intuitively. 
Engage a loose, alert, and aware
body, mind, and sound
then look into the formless
and perceive no thing.
See yourself as a sphere
small at first
growing to encompass
the vastness of infinite space. 
Sit quietly
focus and forget then
in a state of ease and rest
secure the truth of the great achievement.
Employing the truth will not exhaust its power
when it seems exhausted it is really abundant
and while human art will die at the hands of utility
the great achievement is beyond being useful.
Great straightness is curved and crooked
great intelligence is raw and silly
great words are simple and naturally awkward. 
Engaged movement drives out the frozen cold
mindful stillness subdues the frenzied heart.
Sit quietly
focusing
forgetting
summon order from the void
that guides the ordering of the universe."
-  Tao Te ChingChapter 45, Translated by John Bright-Fey, 2006



"There are many matters and many circumstances in which consciousness is undesirable and silence is golden, so that secrecy can be used as a marker to tell us that we are approaching the holy."-  Gregory Bateson, Angels Fear



Sitting in the Garden

Zuowang Meditation

Spirituality and Nature



Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Brighter by the Years



"The physician/essayist Lewis Thomas went further: "The greatest of all accomplishments of twentieth-century science has been the discovery of human ignorance."

Raymo, Chet. When God Is Gone, Everything Is Holy: The Making of a Religious Naturalist By Chet Raymo. Nortre Dame, Indiana, Sorin Books, c 2008. 13 chapters, notes, 148 pages. ISBN: 9781933495132. Clean used copy from Oregon. VSCL. This open-minded Professor Emeritus of Science at Stone Hill College, Massachusetts, advocates a "religious naturalism." He is a lifelong agnostic, atheist, and secular minded person; who, does favor retaining some aspects of religious practices. He strongly supports consensus science as the best path to universal provisional truths, and a rejection of the pre-scientific fables, myths, and lore of the ancients. He was educated in Catholic institutions (e.g., Notre Dame) and taught at a "Catholic" founded College. Very interesting philosophical consideration given to Ocham's Razor, consensus knowledge, "I don't know," genetics, skepticism, and inter-connectivity. Short thoughtful essays.

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Hands Off

 "And now what is the result of all these considerations and quotations?  It is negative in one sense, but positive in another.  It absolutely forbids us to be forward in pronouncing on the meaninglessness of forms of existence other than our own; and it commands us to tolerate, respect and indulge those whom we see harmlessly interested and happy in their own ways, however unintelligible these may be to us.  Hands off: neither the whole of truth, nor the whole of good, is revealed to any single observer, although each observer gains a partial superior insight for the peculiar position in which he stands.  Even prisons and sick rooms have their special revelations.  It is enough to ask of each of us that he should be faithful to his own opportunities and make the most of his own blessings, without presuming to regulate the rest of the vast field."
-  William James, On a Certain Blindness, 1891

Monday, February 13, 2017

Oroville Dam Crisis

Around 60 miles south of our home in Red Bluff is the giant Oroville Dam.  This rock and concrete dam is the tallest in the United States.   This dam is the cornerstore of the California Feather River Project beginning in the 1960's.

We have experienced very heavy rainfall in our Red Bluff area since November.  In the mountains to the east of our home (Lassen and Shasta to the north east; and the Northern Sierra and Feather River to the southeast), they are all covered with more than average snow down to 3,500'.  The wooded western foothills of these mountains have all experienced tremendous rainfall since November.  We have friends in these foothill areas (e.g., Grass Valley) talking to us about the violent winds and rainstorms this winter.  Friends living right on the Sacramento River in Red Bluff are very anxious about the rising river waters.

The Yolly Bolly mountains to the west drain mostly west to the Pacific, and are of little concern. However a few rivers draining east to the Sacramento River, like Cottonwood Creek, 20 miles north of Red Bluff, are over normal capacity.

Red Bluff, and all the towns 130 miles to the south to the city of Sacramento, are located in a valley. We are all downhill from water.

Shasta Dam, 50 miles to the north of us, also creates a massive reservoir of fresh water.

As I write, over 200,000 people have been evacuated south of the Oroville Dam.  Everyone fears that a breach in the Oroville Dam's spillway could send a wall of water 30 feet high bursting out of the dam.

Most of the devastation from a potential Oroville Dam spillway failure would be south of the dam - downhill.  However, such a disaster would also back up the Sacramento River (4 miles east of our home), and would increase flooding in our area.

Wait and worry!






Qigong Ball Exercises

Magic Pearl Qigong  



A Medicine Ball Exercise Routine and Meditation Technique

By Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.
   
Part I, Movements 1-8

Part II, Movements 9-16


The Magic Pearl Qigong is a body/mind movement art practice that was developed in 2009 by Mike Garofalo.  He studied the Chen style Taijiquan medicine ball (Tai Chi Ball) exercises, the Yang Style Taijiquan medicine ball exercises, qigong forms, and general gym styles of medicine ball exercise routines.  He has practiced Qigong and Taijiquan since 1985. 

The psychological, symbolic, magical, esoteric, and meditative aspects of the Magic Pearl Qigong involve Taoist, Buddhist, and mythological lore from China and worldwide.  Followers of Dragon motifs and lore will enjoy the associations found in this form.  Suggestions for related meditations on the concept of the Cosmic Sphere, World Egg, Magic PearlCasting a Magick Circle, and Sacred Circles are also provided. 

For more information on general training with a medicine ball take a look at my Medicine Ball Exercises webpage. 

The Magic Pearl Qigong exercise routine was designed for use with a medicine ball while holding the ball in two hands, so as to allow for the use of heavier medicine balls.  This exercise routine can be done indoors and does not require much space for the practice. Use a medicine ball weighing from 2 to 6 pounds to begin practice of this qigong form. 


brief list of names of the first 8 exercises in the Magic Pearl Qigong has been provided (1 page, .pdf format).  A brief set of instructions for doing the first 8 exercises of the Magic Pearl Qigong has been provided to facilitate learning and encourage daily practice (2 pages, .pdf format).


Valley Spirit Qigong Website

Cloud Hands Tai Chi Chuan Website

Health and Well Being


Sunday, February 12, 2017

Foot, Ankle and Shin Exercises

Because of one consequence of my diabetes, my feet and ankles have problems caused by peripheral neuropathy.  My feet are often very stiff, numb, tingling, and uncomfortable.  The situation is incurable.  

I always wear properly fitting shoes and clean socks.  Wear footwear suitable for the activity you want to engage in.  Keep your feet clean and dry.  

I have found that regular walking, taijiquan, qigong, and yoga all ameliorate my foot problems.  

Here are some exercises I do to help my feet, ankles, and shin.  

1.  Stand, hold on to a chair or cane, and left my heels off the ground - toe raises.  It tenses the calf and muscles of the feet.

2.  Lift the foot off the ground and make circles with the foot.

3.  While seated, lift and extend your leg.  With your foot, trace out each letter of the alphabet.  Do the same activity with each foot.  Trace the letters of the alphabet in both print and cursive styles.  This is one of my favorite exercises.  

4.  While seated, lift and extend your leg.  Extend your toes out as far as you can and lower the toes.  Then, flex the foot, drawing the toes back towards the ankle.  

5.  Gently massage the foot.   

6.  Stand on One Foot

7.  Flex and extend only the toes.  If the toes are stiff and inflexible, then use your hands to push the toes forward and pull the toes back; slowly and gently.  







Saturday, February 11, 2017

California Bees and Blooms

"California is home to over sixteen hundred species of undomesticated bees--most of them native--that populate and pollinate our gardens, fields, and urban green spaces. In this absorbing guidebook, some of the state's preeminent bee and botany experts introduce us to this diverse population. California Bees and Blooms holds a magnifying glass up to the twenty-two most common genera (and six species of cuckoo bees), describing each one's distinctive behaviors, social structures, flight season, preferred flowers, and enemies. Enhancing these descriptions are photographs of bees so finely detailed they capture pollen scattered across gauzy wings and iridescent exoskeletons.
Drawing from years of research at the UC Berkeley Urban Bee Lab, California Bees and Blooms presents an authoritative look at these creatures, emphasizing their vital relationship with flowers. In addition to opening our eyes to the beautiful array of wild bees in our midst, this book provides information on fifty-three bee-friendly plants and how to grow them. Just a few square feet of poppies, sage, and phacelia are enough to sustain a healthy population of wild bees, transforming an urban or suburban garden into a world that hums and buzzes with life."








Friday, February 10, 2017

Tao Te Ching, Chapter 13

Dao De Jing, Laozi
Chapter 13 



"Favor and disgrace would seem equally to be feared;
Honor and great calamity, to be regarded as personal conditions of the same kind.
What is meant by speaking thus of favor and disgrace?
Disgrace is being in a low position after the enjoyment of favor.
The getting that favor leads to the apprehension of losing it, and the losing it leads to the fear of still greater calamity.
This is what is meant by saying that favor and disgrace would seem equally to be feared.
And what is meant by saying that honor and great calamity are to be similarly regarded as personal conditions?
What makes me liable to great calamity is my having the body which I call myself;
If I had not the body, what great calamity could come to me?
Therefore he who would administer the kingdom, honoring it as he honors his own person, may be employed to govern it,
And he who would administer it with the love which he bears to his own person may be entrusted with it."
-  Translated by James Legge, 1891, Chapter 13 




"Favor bodes disgrace; it is like trembling.
Rank bodes great heartache.
It is like the body.
What does 'Favor bodes disgrace; it is like trembling' mean?
Favor humiliates.
Its acquisition causes trembling, its loss causes trembling.
This is what is meant by 'Favor bodes disgrace; it is like trembling.'
What does 'Rank bodes great heartache, it is like the body' mean?
I suffer great heartache because I have a body.
When I have no body, what heartache remains?
Therefore who administers the empire as he takes care of his body can be entrusted with the empire."
-  Translated by D. T. Suzuki and Paul Carus, 1913, Chapter 13 




"Dread glory as you dread shame.
Prize great calamity as you prize your body.
What does this mean:
"Dread glory as you dread shame"?
Glory comes from below.
Obtain it, you are afraid of shame;
Lose it, you are still afraid of shame.
That is why it is said;
"Dread glory as you dread shame."
What does this mean:
"Prize great calamity as you prize your own body"?
We who meet with great calamities, meet them because we have a body.
If we had not a body what calamity could reach us?
Therefore he who honours the kingdom as his body can govern the kingdom.
He who loves the kingdom as his own body can be trusted with the kingdom."
-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 13  




"Favor and disgrace are things that startle;
High rank is, like one's body, a source of great trouble.
What is meant by saying favor and disgrace are things that startle?
Favor when it is bestowed on a subject serves to startle as much as when it is withdrawn.
This is what is meant by saying that favor and disgrace are things that startle.
What is meant by saying that high rank is, like one's body, a source of great trouble?
The reason I have great trouble is that I have a body.
When I no longer have a body, what trouble have I?
Hence he who values his body more than dominion over the empire can be entrusted with the empire.
He who loves his body more than dominion over the empire can be given the custody of the empire."
-  Translated by D. C. Lau, 1963, Chapter 13   



寵辱若驚.
貴大患若身.
何謂寵辱若驚.
寵為下.
得之若驚.
失之若驚是謂寵辱若驚.
何謂貴大患若.
身吾所以有大患者為吾有身.
及吾無身.
吾有何患.
故貴以身為天下若可寄天下.
愛以身為天下, 若可託天下.

-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 13





ch'ung ju jo ching.
kuei ta huan jo shên. 
ho wei ch'ung ju jo ching.
ch'ung wei hsia.
tê chih jo ching.
shih chih jo ching shih wei ch'ung ju jo ching.
ho wei kuei ta huan jo.
shên wu so yi yu ta huan chê wei wu yu shên.
chi wu wu shên.
wu yu ho huan.
ku kuei yi shên wei t'ien hsia chê k'o chi t'ien hsia.
ai yi shên wei t'ien hsia, chê k'o t'o t'ien hsia.
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 13



"Los santos decían: "Alabanzas y culpas causan ansiedad;
El objeto de la esperanza y el miedo está en tu interior".
"Alabanzas y culpas causan ansiedad"
Puesto que esperas o temes recibirlas o perderlas.
"El objeto de la esperanza y el miedo está en tu interior"
Pues, sin un Ego, no pueden afectarte la fortuna o el desastre.
Por tanto:
El que observa al Mundo como se observa a sí mismo es capaz de controlar el Mundo;
Pero el que ama al Mundo como se ama a sí mismo es capaz de dirigir el Mundo."
-  Translated by Antonio Rivas Gonzálvez, 1998, Tao Te Ching, Capítulo 13



"Accept honors and disgraces as surprises,
Treasure great misfortunes as the body.
Why say: "Accept honors and disgraces as surprises"?
Honors elevate (shang),
Disgraces depress (hsia).
One receives them surprised,
Loses them surprised.
Thus: "Accept honors and disgraces as surprises."
Why say: "Treasure great misfortunes as the body"?
I have great misfortunes,
Because I have a body.
If I don't have a body,
What misfortunes do I have?
Therefore treasure the body as the world,
As if the body can be entrusted to the world.
Love the body as the world,
As if the body can be entrusted to the world."
-  Translated by Ellen Marie Chen, 2000, Chapter 13



"You are in everything.
 Everything is in you.
 Create hope and fear and you throw away the Dao.
 Create happiness and sorrow and you will collapse.
 Keep your feet on the ground.
 Love everything as you love yourself.
 Then everything is within your reach."
 -  Translated by Ray Larose, 2000, Chapter 13





A typical webpage created by Mike Garofalo for each one of the 81 Chapters (Verses, Sections) of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) includes 25 different English language translations or interpolations for that Chapter, 5 Spanish language translations for that Chapter, the Chinese characters for that Chapter, the Wade-Giles and Hanyu Pinyin transliterations (Romanization) of the Mandarin Chinese words for that Chapter, and 2 German and 1 French translation of that Chapter.  Each webpage for each one of the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching includes extensive indexing by key words, phrases, and terms for that Chapter in English, Spanish, and the Wade-Giles Romanization.  Each webpage on a Chapter of the Daodejing includes recommended reading in books and websites, a detailed bibliography, some commentary, research leads, translation sources, a Google Translate drop down menu, and other resources for that Chapter. 

  
Chapter 13, Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu.  Complied by Mike Garofalo.  

Chapter and Thematic Index (Concordance) to the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu


English Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index


Spanish Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index


Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices


Taoism: A Selected Reading List



Thursday, February 09, 2017

Taiji Ruler Exercises

The Tai Chi Ruler is a wooden stick about 12 inches long that is used in Qigong exercises. There is some theory involved which is related to hand reflexology, hand acupressure and massage. The Taiji Ruler exercises involve gentle movements, stretching, concentration, and breathing coordination.

You can check my research on the subject of the Tai Chi Ruler.



Wednesday, February 08, 2017

Talking in an Angry Manner

When I was a child, in the 1950's, my mother advised me to not talk frankly with others (coworkers, friends, relatives, acquaintances) about religion, politics, or sex. Why not?  She thought that too many people get overly emotional, too argumentative, narrow minded, and angry when discussing these topics.

My father was somewhat of a bully.  He was a hard working man, intelligent, successful, and worked as a mechanical engineer and manager.  He liked to frequently express his opinions to his wife and three sons about religion (he was a exclusive devotee of Catholicism), politics (Republican, conservative, Moral Majority, jingoistic), and culture (traditional, racist, male chauvinist).  Since he thought his views were correct and true, he tried his best to convince and indoctrinate us all in his viewpoints.  He was tiresome. a browbeater and intolerant.

By the age of 13, I decided that I did not share my father's viewpoints or beliefs, and was not going to live my life by these beliefs.  I had different views about how to think and how to live a good life.   

Donald Trump reminds me of my father: opinionated, argumentative, lacking diplomacy and subtlety, pushy, threatening, decisive, often angry, and a divisive and polarizing influence.  For a President, these qualities are dangerous.  I try to stay positive, listen, support positive ideas, and hope for the best; but, I am very doubtful about his leadership abilities.  

Anger is a powerful emotion, sometimes justified, but most often irrational and with tragic consequences. Do we do our best work when angry?  Do we make the best choices when angry?  Do we intelligently evaluate evidence when we are angry?  Do we enjoy life when we are angry?  Are we more helpful to others when we are angry?  Does anger contribute to a peaceful life with others?  Are angry people more tolerant?  Do angry people produce good work in the sciences, arts, or humanities?  Are angry people with guns helpful to our community?  Do you walk better, do yoga better, do Tai Chi Chuan better, garden better, or find spiritual solace better when you are angry?  

I don't discuss politics, religion or sexual customs very much in my blog or webpages.  I guess I listened more to my mother.

Tuesday, February 07, 2017

February Gardening

February Gardening Chores
Red Bluff, North Sacramento Valley, California, USA
USDA Zone 9

Typical Seasonal Weather for Our Area, USDA Zone 9 Normally, in February, we have high daytime temperatures of 59ºF, low nighttime temperatures of 40ºF, and get 3.4 inches of rain.

Red Bluff Gardening Notebooks of Karen and Mike Garofalo

Cloud Hands Blog Follow the seasons in the Northern California garden of Karen and Mike with their notes, links, resources, quotes, poems, and photos.

February Garden Activities and Chores in Red Bluff
USDA Zone 9

February: Quotes, Sayings, Poems.  Compiled by Mike Garofalo.  


February Gardening Chores

Browsing and ordering from seed and garden catalogs.
Pruning leafless trees and shrubs.
Weeding and tending the winter vegetable garden.
Relax and read books.  
The soil is usually too wet and cold for much digging.
Keeping cold sensitive potted plants in protected areas or indoors.
Make sure that the cuttings in protected areas do not dry out.
Repair fences.
Put straw mulch over fertilized vegetable garden areas not planted.
Distribute fertilizer and minerals.
Weed the sunny vegetable garden.  

Prune and mulch dormant perennials.
Planting bare root trees and shrubs.  

Remove dead trees, shrubs, branches, and twigs.
Enjoy the bulbs and rosemary in bloom.
Repair and sharpen tools.
Construct gardening boxes and flats.
Write a poem. Keep a gardening journal.
Fertilize with 20-9-9 or 15-15-15.
Trees without leaves need little or no watering.
Take a walk in your garden.
Sit and observe.
Turn the compost pile.  

Burn piles of gardening cuttings saved since last February.


Here are some photographs of our yard and gardens in February:












Monday, February 06, 2017

Come in From the Rain


"Man is not an aquatic animal, but from the time we stand in
youthful wonder beside a Spring brook till we sit in old age
and watch the endless roll of the sea, we feel a strong kinship
with the waters of this world."
- Hal Borland, Sundial of the Seasons



leafless trees
dripping-

winter storm
Mike Garofalo, Cuttings


Rain and Water: Quotations, Poetry, Sayings.  Compiled by Mike Garofalo.


It has been very windy and raining in Red Bluff.  Northern California has received more than normal rainfall and snow during the month of January.  

Here are some photographs of the flooding on our property in Red Bluff.








We are home now and back into our normal routines.  

We continue to make improvements in our home.  We have realtors and buyers contacting us about selling our home.  Buyers are coming this weekend to visit our home.  

Our camping trip to Bullard's Beach State Park in Oregon was outstanding.  

Our next beach trip in March will be to Rockaway Beach in Oregon.  

We now have a portable beach tent and low beach chairs.  Essential for extended outings out to windy and cool beaches.  

Yesterday, we watched the documentary film "Cooked" based on the book by Michael Pollan.  Excellent insights into a variety of aspects (social, scientific, culinary, agriculture, cultural, manufacturing) of food and cooking.  I am now reading his book "The Omnivore's Dilemma."