Showing posts with label Sun Taijiquan. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Sun Taijiquan. Show all posts

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Walk and Be Happy

"The sum of the whole is this: walk and be happy, walk and be healthy. "The best of all ways to lengthen our days" is not, as Mr. Thomas Moore has it, "to steal a few hours from night, my love;" but, with leave be it spoken, to walk steadily and with a purpose. The wandering man knows of certain ancients, far gone in years, who have staved off infirmities and dissolution by earnest walking,--hale fellows close upon eighty and ninety, but brisk as boys."
-  Charles Dickens  


The Ways of Walking


"It’s all still there in heart and soul. The walk, the hills, the sky, the solitary pain and pleasure–they will grow larger, sweeter, lovelier in the days and years to come." 
-   Edward Abbey  



When I am not scheduled to work at my part-time job for the elementary school district, I get outdoors and start walking at 6 am.  In between each lap of my walking track (.6 miles round trip [pictured below]) I practice Taijiquan forms [e.g., Sun Style Single Whip Left pictured below].  









Friday, February 15, 2013

Sun Style Tai Chi Chuan

 

"The natural course of things is always followed. This prevents one from harming their post-heaven strength. Focus is on beneficial cultivation of one's natural life force as the core of training.  All people - men, women, the old, and the young - may practice in order to replace temerity with bravery; and stiffness with pliability. Those of you who are weak, who suffer from fatigue and injury or illness, or who have weakened your qi from the practice of other martial arts to the point that you no longer have the strength to train, all of you may practice Tai Ji Quan. With practice, the qi will quickly return to a balanced state and will become strong, while the spirit naturally returns to a state of wholeness. Disease will be eliminated and the length of life increased."
- Sun Lu-Tang, A Study of Taijiquan, 1924. Translated by Tim Cartmell, p. 60.
Sun Style Tai Ji Quan

Style Internal Martial Arts

Sun Style of Taijiquan International Standard Competition 73 Movements Form

Research by Michael P. Garofalo, M.S..  Notes from 2005-2012.  

This webpage includes an introduction, information on the Sun Taijiquan form, a large collection of quotations about Sun Taijiquan, a detailed bibliography, extensive links, references to video and DVD resources, and suggestions for learning the international competition Sun 73 form.  A detailed comparative list of the names of each of the 73 movements is provided, with source references, and the movement names are given in English, Pinyin Chinese, Chinese characters, French, German, and Spanish.  A detailed description of the first 40 movements is provided along with instructions, commentary and general comments.  Black and white line illustrations for each movement sequence (1-40) are provided. This is the most detailed and complete webpage on the subject of the Sun Taijiquan 73 Competition Form available on the Internet.  

I will complete my study and analysis of the Sun Taijiquan International Competition 73 Movement Form by 2015.  I only know and regularly practice movements 1-50 of this competition form at the present time.   

Sun Lu Tang's Internal Martial Arts: Taijiquan, Baguazhang, Hsing I Quan, Weapons, and Qigong

Students of Sun Taijiquan now have more English language resources on the Traditional 98 Form created by Grandmaster Sun Lutang and published in 1921.  For examples: 
 
Traditional Sun Style Taijiquan  By Tim Cartmell and Troyce Thome.  Boston, McGraw Hill Learning Soulutions, 2010.  222 pages.  ISBN: 0078039142.  This is the most detailed instruction that I have seen on the Traditional Taijiquan 98 movement form created by Grandmaster Sun Lutang.  Saddleback College Course CPS7, Mission Viejo, California.  VSCL. 

Traditional Sun Style Taijiquan.  Instructional DVDs by Tim Cartmell.  "This 5 DVD set includes complete and precise instruction of the entire traditional Sun style Taijiquan form. Every posture and movement of the long form is covered in full detail, in addition the DVDs also include detailed instruction of postural alignment, power building exercises, footwork, methods of partner testing for every posture in the form and numerous demonstrations of the martial applications of the form movements." 




Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Sun Style Taijiquan

Sun Style Taijiquan 73 Movements International Competition Form: Bibliography, Links, Lessons, Quotations


Sun Style Taijiquan Sword (Jian) 62 Movements Form:  Bibliography, Links, Lists, Quotes

I had some comments and questions this week about the Sun Style of Taijiquan:

"Hello Mike, I have now decided (after about 4 years of Sun 97 form) that I would like to do the Swordplay of Sun Jian Yun....... I have the instructional DVD and have looked your website over and am pleased to see what you have available as helps.  You mentioned you have learned the Sun Taiji Jian 62 form and used the resources you list.  A couple of questions please: Since I don't have a lot of room.... 6' x 15', I am sort of curious about some hints you might give me to learn the sword without cutting up my table and chairs lol. Secondly, I am looking into a wooden sword for learning practice.... does that sound good to do?  Because of the weight difference should I just go ahead and look into a spring steel one?  Lastly, I see there is a "collapsible" sword (I guess that's what you call them) do you have any thought on that?  Any and all hints and pointers would be so greatly appreciated. (I am as you are in that I am the "lone" Sun shi player in Central Illinois -- Danville -- just west of Indy about 90 miles on the Interstate) I do teach 24 form and Tai Chi for Health at my community college -- I am certified in Dr. Lam's Tai chi for Arthritis.... second time) Thanks for your help in advance."  From Victor V, 4/21/2012
My response: 
Victor,
Great to hear about your steady practice of the Sun 97 Form.  Nice to hear that you are teaching the 24 form for its health benefits. Dr. Lam has done a lot to popularize Sun Shi Taiji. 
I favor a steel Jian double edged Tai Chi sword that is stiff and straight.  I use the Paul Chen fully tempered high carbon steel Tai Chi sword - around $120.00.  I do not like the Wushu flexible and light steel swords that wiggle and twang; or the funky unattractive collapsible Tai Chi swords that I have seen.  Wooden jian sword replicas are light and generally inexpensive - and quite popular. For indoor practice, maybe you can use a short wood dowel of 2 feet for $3.00 ... a "magic wand" jian.  
I use a cane for practicing my Tai Chi cane forms, saber forms and sword forms outdoors.  I know that most Taiji weapons' players would insist on practice with a proper steel sword or saber; so I'm in the minority on this recommendation.  A good, properly sized, martial arts cane is very easy to carry anywhere and nobody notices.  It is a "real" weapon.  I practice forms more because I use a cane.  I use a pure hickory heartwood cane, Instructor's Walking Cane, 40" (103 cm) long and 1" (2.54 cm) in diameter, from Cane Masters.  
Best wishes, Mike

"Love your website, surprised you didn't have this link. My favorite for the Sun 98.
Sunstyle taijiquan performed by Master Wang Yanji. Maste Wang studied wushu- martial arts from family Li, And has studied to the Chinese many martial arts famous experts."
Regards, tcsail09
I added this UTube Video (7:21 minutes) to my list of Sun 98 resources today. 

Sunday, April 15, 2012

Sun Style Internal Martial Arts

Sun Style of Taijiquan International Standard Competition 73 Movements Form

Research by Michael P. Garofalo, M.S..  Notes from 2005-2012.  

This webpage includes an introduction, information on the Sun Taijiquan form, a large collection of quotations about Sun Taijiquan, a detailed bibliography, extensive links, references to video and DVD resources, and suggestions for learning the international competition Sun 73 form.  A detailed comparative list of the names of each of the 73 movements is provided, with source references, and the movement names are given in English, Pinyin Chinese, Chinese characters, French, German, and Spanish.  A detailed description of the first 40 movements is provided along with instructions, commentary and general comments.  Black and white line illustrations for each movement sequence (1-40) are provided. This is the most detailed and complete webpage on the subject of the Sun Taijiquan 73 Competition Form available on the Internet.  

I will complete my study and analysis of the Sun Taijiquan International Competition 73 Movement Form by 2015.  I only know and regularly practice movements 1-50 of this competition form at the present time.   

Sun Lu Tang's Internal Martial Arts: Taijiquan, Baguazhang, Hsing I Quan, Weapons, and Qigong

Students of Sun Taijiquan now have more English language resources on the Traditional 98 Form created by Grandmaster Sun Lutang and published in 1921.  For examples: 
 
Traditional Sun Style Taijiquan  By Tim Cartmell and Troyce Thome.  Boston, McGraw Hill Learning Soulutions, 2010.  222 pages.  ISBN: 0078039142.  This is the most detailed instruction that I have seen on the Traditional Taijiquan 98 movement form created by Grandmaster Sun Lutang.  Saddleback College Course CPS7, Mission Viejo, California.  VSCL. 

Traditional Sun Style Taijiquan.  Instructional DVDs by Tim Cartmell.  "This 5 DVD set includes complete and precise instruction of the entire traditional Sun style Taijiquan form. Every posture and movement of the long form is covered in full detail, in addition the DVDs also include detailed instruction of postural alignment, power building exercises, footwork, methods of partner testing for every posture in the form and numerous demonstrations of the martial applications of the form movements."

Friday, December 30, 2011

Grandmaster Sun Lu Tang (1861-1933)

"When a modern day "New Age" practitioner of tai chi speaks of the art as being "good for his health and a way to align his energy with the energy of the Tao," that viewpoint came largely from Sun Lu Tang. Or when pa kua practitioners walk the pa kua circle on a California beach and talk of how "pa kua forms are physical embodiments of the I-Ching," their ideas derive largely from Sun Lu Tang. Or when modern day practitioners of xing yi opine that "the five forms of xing yi interact like the five basic elements in Taoist cosmology," they to owe their thinking largely to Sun Lu Tang."
- Elisabeth Guo and Brian L. Kennedy, Sun Lu Tang: Fighter, Scholar and Image Maker.

Sun Style Taijiquan: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotes
By Michael P. Garofalo


Thursday, November 03, 2011

Tai Chi Chuan 32 Sword Form

32 Sword Form, Simplified, Yang Style, Taijiquan Jian. This popular webpage by Mike Garofalo includes a comprehensive bibliography, scores of links to webpages; an extensive listing of the names and name variations for each movement in English, Chinese, French, German, and Spanish; a detailed analysis of each posture and movement sequence with explanations, and numbered illustrations and detailed instructions; selected quotations; comments on 20 Taijiquan sword techniques; a comprehensive media bibliography; a chart of performance times; and, a comparison of the 32 and 55 sword forms in the Yang style. This is the standard, simplified, orthodox, 1957, 32 Taiji Sword Form, in the Yang Style of T'ai Chi Ch'uan.

32 Taijiquan Simplified Sword Form


20 T'ai Chi Ch'uan Sword Techniques


55 Classical Yang Taiji Sword





The Wild Horse Jumps Over the Mountain Stream




Zhong Kui

Vanquisher of Demons
Protector of the Home

Tuesday, September 06, 2011

Sun Style Taijiquan Workshop in Oregon in September 2011

"It is my pleasure to inform you about an upcoming Traditional Sun Style Taijiquan workshop being held in Gresham, Oregon September 17th & 18th.  The workshop will be led by Troyce Thome, an energetic, experienced Tai Chi instructor whose workshops are designed for the beginner as well as for the advanced taiji practitioner looking to deepen their understanding of the fundamental principles of Traditional Sun Style Taijiquan. She has 18 years of experience teaching taijiquan and has studied with some of the most talented taijiquan teachers in this the USA and in China, including the study of Traditional Sun Style Taijiquan with Tim Cartmell. For more information on the workshop and Troyce Thome please visit www.taichiforhealth.net."

Troyce Thome is a fine teacher and co-author with Tim Cartmell of a new book on the Sun Style of Taijiaun.  I attended her Tai Chi for Arthritis II workshop in the Bay Area a few years ago.  

I enjoy playing the Sun Style Taijiquan 73 Competition Form.   



Sunday, February 13, 2011

Follow the Natural Course

"The natural course of things is always followed. This prevents one from harming their post-heaven strength. Focus is on beneficial cultivation of one's natural life force as the core of training.  All people - men, women, the old, and the young - may practice in order to replace temerity with bravery; and stiffness with pliability. Those of you who are weak, who suffer from fatigue and injury or illness, or who have weakened your qi from the practice of other martial arts to the point that you no longer have the strength to train, all of you may practice Tai Ji Quan. With practice, the qi will quickly return to a balanced state and will become strong, while the spirit naturally returns to a state of wholeness. Disease will be eliminated and the length of life increased."
- Sun Lu-Tang, A Study of Taijiquan, 1924. Translated by Tim Cartmell, p. 60.
Sun Style Tai Ji Quan

Thursday, June 17, 2010

Beneficial Cultivation

"The natural course of things is always followed. This prevents one from harming their post-heaven strength. Focus is on beneficial cultivation of one's natural life force as the core of training.
All people - men, women, the old, and the young - may practice in order to replace temerity with bravery; and stiffness with pliability. Those of you who are weak, who suffer from fatigue and injury or illness, or who have weakened your qi from the practice of other martial arts to the point that you no longer have the strength to train, all of you may practice Tai Ji Quan. With practice, the qi will quickly return to a balanced state and will become strong, while the spirit naturally returns to a state of wholeness. Disease will be eliminated and the length of life increased."
- Sun Lu-Tang, A Study of Taijiquan, 1924. Translated by Tim Cartmell, p. 60. 

Sun Lu Tang's (1861-1933) Style of Internal Martial Arts

Friday, June 19, 2009

Sun Tai Chi Chuan Characteristics

"The Four Characteristics of Sun Shi Tai Ji:

1. The natural position of the body. The position of the body is more natural than in other forms of Tai Ji. The basic position - San Ti Shi - comes from Xing Yi. It differs from the traditional basic position - Hun Yuan Zhuang. The position of the body is higher (angle with the knees of 135°), the axis head - centre of gravity falls on only one foot and not with equal distance of the two feet, the feet are positioned one compared to the other according to an angle of 45° and not in parallel or are aligned like usually used in other schools of Tai Ji. All these characteristics respect the natural positioning of the body with two consequences. Initially a practice more favorable to health, without excessive wear (of the knees in particular). Then, a good balance between stability and flexibility.

2. Flexible and fast movement. The movement of the feet is flexible and fast: as soon as a leg advances or moves back, the other leg follows immediately. One does not find in Sun Shi Tai a horse riding stance with feet equal distance apart or the bow and arrow posture of traditional Tai Ji. In Sun Shi, one uses the free steps coming from Xing Yi and of Bagua. The centre of gravity always falls on one leg; a foot supports all the weight of the body, the other follows, free. The steps forwards are the steps of Beng Quan, and backwards the steps of Pi Quan. The steps of rotation correspond to the steps of Ba Gua. Sun Shi is light, fluid and fast. It is compared with the water which runs and with the clouds which slip into a windy sky.

3. The specific figure of Kai He. Sun Shi Tai Ji has a very specific figure; Kai He (to open - to close) which is found neither in other forms of Tai Ji, nor in Ba Gua or Xing Yi. This Kai He appears with each connection and transition. It makes it possible to control and adjust breathing and to accumulate the Shi (energy potential) in order to prepare for the next change.

4. It is an art which aims at effectiveness in combat. Sun Shi Tai Ji is truly an art of combat. The amplitude of the gestures is limited, the course of the hands are direct, natural and aims to be effective. . It is not the force of the arms which strike, but the sum total of the elastic force of each movement carried out on a correct and uniform axis of gravity."
- Master Bob Melia, Sun Shi Tai Chi

Sun Taijiquan: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Instructions, Quotes, Glossary
By Mike Garofalo.

Research by Mike Garofalo

Sun Taijiquan Website Index Page

Sun Lu Tang (1861-1933) Biographical Information

Sun Tai Chi Chuan International Competition 73 Form
Instructions, Bibliography, Links, Resources.

Sun Taijiquan Blog

Sun Taijiquan Dictionary

Sun Lu Tang's Xing Yi Quan (Hsing I Chuan)

Sun Lu Tang's Baguazhang (BaQua Quan)

Friday, February 13, 2009

Tai Chi for Arthritis Workshop, Sun Taijiquan

Tai Chi for Arthritis: An Arthritis Foundation Tai Chi Program
Instructor: Robin Malby
February 28 and March 1, 2009
Folsom, California

For more information please contact Robin Malby.

Monday, April 28, 2008

Sun Style Taijiquan Traditional Sword Form


Sun Lu Tang's Internal Martial Arts: Xingyiquan, Baguaquan, and Taijiquan.

Here are two works in progress:


Sun Style Taijiquan Sword Form. Being developmed now. It will include an introduction, information on the history of the traditional Sun Taijiquan Sword form, a detailed bibliography, extensive links, references to video resources, a large collection of quotations about Sun Taijiquan, recommendations on the best media resources on the topic, and suggestions for learning the Sun Taijiquan Sword Form. A detailed list of the names of each of the movements will be provided, with source references, and the movement names will be given in English, Chinese, Chinese characters, French, German, and Spanish. This webpage will include detailed descriptions for each of the movements with black and white photographs illustrating each movement sequence along with commentary and comparisons. Many additional nomenclature lists and section study charts in the PDF format, photographs and graphics will be provided. This webpage will be the most detailed and complete document on the subject of the traditional Sun Taijiquan Sword Form available on the WWW. Expected completion date: September 20, 2008.


Sun Style of T'ai Chi Ch'uan: Standard Competition 73 Movements Form. Research by Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.. Webpage: 450Kb, July 2008. This webpage includes an introduction, information on the history of the Sun Taijiquan forms, a detailed bibliography, extensive links, references to video resources, a large collection of quotations about Sun Taijiquan, recommendations on the best media resources on the topic, and suggestions for learning the 73 competition Sun Taijiquan form. A detailed comparative list of the names of each of the 73 movements is provided, with source references, and the movement names are given in English, Chinese, Chinese characters, French, German, and Spanish. This webpage includes detailed descriptions of each of the 73 movements with black and white illustrations for each movement sequence along with commentary and comparisons. Many additional nomenclature lists and section study charts in the PDF format, photographs and graphics are also provided - over 1 MB of information. This webpage is the most detailed and complete document on the subject of the Sun Taijiquan Competition 73 Form available on the Internet. This document was published by Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Red Bluff, California, 2008. URL: http://www.egreenway.com/taichichuan/sun73.htm.


Saturday, April 19, 2008

Taijiquan - Sun Style

Ocean Hou's Sun Style 73 Competition Taiji Form Demonstration.
UTube, 5:01 min, color. A Master level performance by Ocean Hou. A very nice soundtrack with renaissance style music. The performance in a beautiful titled patio of a public garden. This is the best online video of a performance of the Sun 73 form.

Sun Style Tai Chi Chuan, 73 Movements Competition Form, List of Movements: 1-73
(PDF, 133 Kb, 4 Pages) Each of the 73 movements are numbered and the name is given in English, Chinese, and the Chinese Characters for the name.


The Competition Routine of Sun Style Taijiquan.
Zhong Shan, Chief Editor. Wu Don, Executive Editor. Li Wei, Editor of English Version. Published in Beijing, China, 2003. 151 pages. ISBN: 7537720851. A detailed study of the Sun Taijiquan 73 standard competition form. Book comes with a VCD, color, 50 minutes. The accompanying VCD ISRC: CN-C20-02-0040-O/V-G8. I could not find identification of the performer or instructor on the VCD. There is no English narration on the VCD, just music.

Sun Taijiquan: Standard Competition 73 Movements Form.
Research by Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.. Webpage: 350Kb, May 2008. This webpage includes an introduction, information on the Sun Taijiquan form, a large collection of quotations about Sun Taijiquan, a detailed bibliography, extensive links, references to video resources, and suggestions for learning the 73 competition Sun form. A detailed comparative list of the names of each of the 73 movements is provided, with source references, and the movement names are given in English, Pinyin Chinese, Chinese characters, French, German, and Spanish. A detailed description of each of the 73 movements with black and white illustrations for each movement sequence is provided along with instructions, commentary and general comments. This is the most detailed and complete webpage on the subject available on the Internet.

Thursday, April 17, 2008

Sun Lu Tang's Tai Chi Chuan

Sun Taijiquan: Standard Competition 73 Movements Form
Research by Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.
Webpage: 350Kb, April, 2008

This webpage includes an introduction, information on the Sun Taijiquan form, a large collection of quotations about Sun Tai Chi Chuan, a detailed bibliography, extensive links, references to video resources, and suggestions for learning the 73 competition Sun form.

A detailed comparative list of the names of each of the 73 movements is provided, with source references, and the movement names are given in English, Pinyin Chinese, Chinese characters, French, German, and Spanish.

A detailed description of each of the 73 movements with black and white illustrations for each movement sequence is provided along with instructions, commentary and general comments.

This is the most detailed and complete webpage on the subject available on the Internet.

All my research and writing efforts in the Internal Martial Arts (Taijiquan and Baguazhang) are now focused on developing the Sun Tai Chi Chuan 73 Competition Form webpage. I am refining my practice of this form every day. I welcome any suggestions regarding Sun Taijiquan or Sun Baguazhang.

Sunday, April 13, 2008

Sun Taijiquan 73 Form



I have been practicing the Sun Taijiquan 73 Form each day, along with the Yang 24, Yang 108, and Sword 32 forms.

I continue to work on the webpage for the Sun Taiijiquan 73 Competition Form.

Sun Style of T'ai Chi Ch'uan: Standard Competition 73 Movements Form. Research by Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.. Webpage: 350Kb, May 2008. This webpage includes an introduction, information on the Sun Taijiquan form, a large collection of quotations about Sun Taijiquan, a detailed bibliography, extensive links, references to video resources, and suggestions for learning the 73 competition Sun form. A detailed comparative list of the names of each of the 73 movements is provided, with source references, and the movement names are given in English, Pinyin Chinese, Chinese characters, French, German, and Spanish. Additional section lists for study are provided. A detailed description of each of the 73 movements with black and white illustrations for each movement sequence is provided along with instructions, commentary and general comments. This is the most detailed and complete webpage on the subject of the Sun Taijiquan 73 Competition Form available on the Internet.



"The Four Characteristics of Sun Shi Tai Ji:

1. The natural position of the body. The position of the body is more natural than in other forms of Tai Ji. The basic position - San Ti Shi - comes from Xing Yi. It differs from the traditional basic position - Hun Yuan Zhuang. The position of the body is higher (angle with the knees of 135°), the axis head - centre of gravity falls on only one foot and not with equal distance of the two feet, the feet are positioned one compared to the other according to an angle of 45° and not in parallel or are aligned like usually used in other schools of Tai Ji. All these characteristics respect the natural positioning of the body with two consequences. Initially a practice more favorable to health, without excessive wear (of the knees in particular). Then, a good balance between stability and flexibility.

2. Flexible and fast movement. The movement of the feet is flexible and fast: as soon as a leg advances or moves back, the other leg follows immediately. One does not find in Sun Shi Tai a horse riding stance with feet equal distance apart or the bow and arrow posture of traditional Tai Ji. In Sun Shi, one uses the free steps coming from Xing Yi and of Bagua. The centre of gravity always falls on one leg; a foot supports all the weight of the body, the other follows, free. The steps forwards are the steps of Beng Quan, and backwards the steps of Pi Quan. The steps of rotation correspond to the steps of Ba Gua. Sun Shi is light, fluid and fast. It is compared with the water which runs and with the clouds which slip into a windy sky.

3. The specific figure of Kai He. Sun Shi Tai Ji has a very specific figure; Kai He (to open - to close) which is found neither in other forms of Tai Ji, nor in Ba Gua or Xing Yi. This Kai He appears with each connection and transition. It makes it possible to control and adjust breathing and to accumulate the Shi (energy potential) in order to prepare for the next change.

4. It is an art which aims at effectiveness in combat. Sun Shi Tai Ji is truly an art of combat. The amplitude of the gestures is limited, the course of the hands are direct, natural and aims to be effective. . It is not the force of the arms which strike, but the sum total of the elastic force of each movement carried out on a correct and uniform axis of gravity."
- Master Bob Melia, Sun Shi Tai Chi

Saturday, April 05, 2008

Sun Taijiquan 73 Competition Form

Most of my efforts lately have been devoted to improving the Sun Tai Chi Chuan International Competition 73 Movement Form webpage. I reorganized the structure of the webpage this week. Next week, I plan to prepare graphics and instructions for Movements 1 -5.

This webpage will eventually include a list of the movements of the 73 form, instructions for each of the movements with illustrations, a bibliography, comprehensive links, a chart of performance times for the 73 Form, selected quotations, general remarks, an introduction, and a brief history of the 73 Form. At present, the webpage is about 160 Kb in size.

Saturday, June 30, 2007

Sun Taijiquan Characteristics

"The Four Characteristics of Sun Shi Tai Ji:
1. The natural position of the body. The position of the body is more natural than in other forms of Tai Ji. The basic position - San Ti Shi - comes from Xing Yi. It differs from the traditional basic position - Hun Yuan Zhuang. The position of the body is higher (angle with the knees of 135°), the axis head - centre of gravity falls on only one foot and not with equal distance of the two feet, the feet are positioned one compared to the other according to an angle of 45° and not in parallel or are aligned like usually used in other schools of Tai Ji. All these characteristics respect the natural positioning of the body with two consequences. Initially a practice more favorable to health, without excessive wear (of the knees in particular). Then, a good balance between stability and flexibility.
2. Flexible and fast movement. The movement of the feet is flexible and fast: as soon as a leg advances or moves back, the other leg follows immediately. One does not find in Sun Shi Tai a horse riding stance with feet equal distance apart or the bow and arrow posture of traditional Tai Ji. In Sun Shi, one uses the free steps coming from Xing Yi and of Bagua. The centre of gravity always falls on one leg; a foot supports all the weight of the body, the other follows, free. The steps forwards are the steps of Beng Quan, and backwards the steps of Pi Quan. The steps of rotation correspond to the steps of Ba Gua. Sun Shi is light, fluid and fast. It is compared with the water which runs and with the clouds which slip into a windy sky.
3. The specific figure of Kai He. Sun Shi Tai Ji has a very specific figure; Kai He (to open - to close) which is found neither in other forms of Tai Ji, nor in Ba Gua or Xing Yi. This Kai He appears with each connection and transition. It makes it possible to control and adjust breathing and to accumulate the Shi (energy potential) in order to prepare for the next change.
4. It is an art which aims at effectiveness in combat. Sun Shi Tai Ji is truly an art of combat. The amplitude of the gestures is limited, the course of the hands are direct, natural and aims to be effective. . It is not the force of the arms which strike, but the sum total of the elastic force of each movement carried out on a correct and uniform axis of gravity."
- Master Bob Melia, Sun Shi Tai Chi

Sun Taijiquan: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Instructions, Quotes, Glossary
By Mike Garofalo. 1MB+

Research by Mike Garofalo

Sun Taijiquan Website Index Page

Sun Lu Tang (1861-1933) Biographical Information

Sun Tai Chi Chuan International Competition 73 Form
Instructions, Bibliography, Links, Resources. 115Kb.

Sun Taijiquan Blog

Sun Taijiquan Dictionary

Sun Lu Tang's Xing Yi Quan (Hsing I Chuan)

Sun Lu Tang's Baguazhang (BaQua Quan)

Wednesday, May 23, 2007

Sun Style of Taijiquan

Guidelines for the Practice of Sun Style Taijiquan Traditional Long Form

"According to Master Sun Jian-yun, the learner must observe the following specific guidelines in the training of Sun's Style of Tai-chi Chuan:

1. Consecutive Forward or Backward Steps

This is a movement occurring repeatedly in a major portion of the postures. Whenever the learner makes a move forward or backward with one leg, the other leg will do likewise. It is a striking feature of Sun's Style that the game always goes together with consecutive forward or backward steps. That is, whenever the foreleg moves forward, the hind leg will follow suit, and vice versa. As the two legs are moving to and fro most of the time, Sun's Style is well known for nimble feet and agility. However, if there had not been any check measures, nimble feet and agility would have led to imbalance where the body might not be maintained upright and the player tends to stoop down or lean backward.

2. Symmetric Exertion of Strength.

There must be counter strength exerted in every movement. Whenever the learner make a move forward, he must exert backward strength, and vice versa. This is the check measure to redress the above tendency of imbalance. As pointed out by Master Sun Jian-yun in her book "Sun's Style: Tai-chi Chuan and Sword-play (1997), "When making a consecutive forward move with both legs, the player's center of gravity being in motion is likely to creative imbalance where the player may bend forward. In order to maintain good balance, the player should push the sole of the front foot backward upon touching the ground so that the center of gravity will shift to the hind leg upon its touching the ground subsequently. The same principle also applies to consecutive backward moves."

3. San-ti Stance:

This is the fundamental posture from which a variety of postures are derived. The learner must master its application throughout the game and understand how it is adapted to the derivative postures. Grand Master Sun Lu-Tang has time and again stressed the importance of this posture, saying "San-ti is the prototype of all postures of Xing-yi Chuan." Such a saying is in fact true of Sun's Style Tai-chi Chuan. No wonder Master Sun Jian-yun pointed out emphatically, "San-ti posture is the foundation of the whole framework of postures in Sun's Style Tai-chi Chuan."

- Sun Jian-yun and Paul F. N. Tam. Sun's Style Tai Chi Chuan. Translated by Peter Chen and Leung Ming Yuen. Pubished by Peter Chan and Company, Hong Kong, 2003. 141 pages. Plum Publications. p.3-4.

Saturday, May 19, 2007

Sun Tai Chi Chuan Videos Online

There are many good instructional DVDs, VCDs and VHS videotapes for students of Taijiquan, Xing I Quan, and Baguazhang now available for purchase. I have cited these resources in my bibliographies on the subjects at the Cloud Hands Website.

The quantity and quality of such instructional media for the study of Sun Style Taijiquan has increased greatly over the last 10 years.

Finally, in the last three years, we a seen the emergence of Google Video and UTube, and now many videos are online. I have prepared a fairly complete listing of videos online that can be used in the study of Sun Style Taijiquan.

Those who practice Xing Yi Quan and Staff Weapons will find a number of new entries on my webpages on the two subjects.