Thursday, June 20, 2019

Fishing in Clark County

My son is taking my grandaughter fishing next week.  I was invited to join in the outing.  I need to renew my fishing license and get my fishing gear out of storage.  

We could fish in many nearby lakes or rivers.  Fishing opportunities abound in the Columbia River Gorge area where we live.  

Traveling the Rivers of Washington: Sightseeing, Fishing, Nature Studies

Washington River Maps and Fishing Guide.  By Doug Rose.  Frank Amato Publications, 2013.  87 pages.  ISBN: 978-1571885135.  VSCL.  Excellent resource for river trips and fishing.


Washington's Best Fishing Waters.  Wilderness Adventures Press, 2nd Edition, 2007.  161 pages.  ISBN: 978-1932098525.  VSCL. 


Washington Lake Maps and Fishing Guide.  By Bill McMillan.  Edited and illustrated by Esther Appel.  Frank Amato Publications, 2012.  48 pages.  ISBN: 978-1571884770.  VSCL. 



Flyfisher's Guide to Washington.  By Greg Thomas.  The Wilderness Adventures Flyfisher's Guide Series.  Wilderness Adventures Press, 2013.  500 pages.  ISBN: 978-185106582.  VSCL.  

Monday, June 10, 2019

North Cascades National Park


In June of 2019 we enjoyed a sightseeing trip to northern Washington.

Day 1: Vancouver to Bellingham via Interstate 5 and 405. Good views of Mt. Ranier. 

Day 2: Bellingham via 9 to Sedro-Woodley, Skagit River, then on Route 20 through the North Cascades National Park, over Washington Pass, and down to the Methrow River Valley and to the town of Winthrop. 

Day 3: Twisp, Okanogan, Omak, apple orchards, Route 97, Lake Chelan, Columbia River, Wenatchee. 

Day 4: Apple orchards everywhere, Route 2, Levingston, Monroe, Seattle, Olympia, Vancouver.

The North Cascades Highway: A Roadside Guide to America's Alps.  By Jack McLeod.  Seattle, University of Washington Press, 2013.  Index, 104 pages.  ISBN: 978-0295993164.  VSCL. 

North Cascades: The Story Behind the Scenery.  By Saul Weisberg.  KC Publications, 1988.  48 pages.  ISBN: 978-0887140211.  VSCL.  


Our Travels in Washington: Notes, Bibliography, Guides, Resources

















Friday, May 31, 2019

Front Yard Gardening Project 431B


The Spirit of Gardening Website


Our Front Yard in Vancouver, Washington
Spring 2019
Front Yard Gardening Projects
Project 431
Karen and Mike Garofalo








"Good work is dignified. It develops your faculties and serves your community.  It is a central human activity.  Work, in this view: makes you honest with yourself, requires that you develop your faculties and skills, empowers you to do what you are really good at and love to do, connects you in a compassionate way with the outside world, supports the philosophy of non-destructiveness and sustainability, and integrates work with personal life and community."-  Roger Pritchard


"Once one knows what really matters, one ceases to be voluble.  And what does really matter?  That is easy: thinking and doing, doing and thinking - and these are the sum of all wisdom.  Both must move ever onward in life, to and fro, like breathing in and breathing out.  Whoever makes it a rule to test action by thought, thought by action, cannot falter, and if he does, will soon find his way back to the right road." -  Johann Wolfgang von Goethe



















Tuesday, May 28, 2019

Outside in a Cool Dream


Outside in a Cool Dream

I yanked off my shirt and toweled off the sweat,
Tossed off my shoes all smelly and wet,
Stretched out my back on the cool tile floor,
Freed from the smoky heat outside the door.


I slipped into dreaming about walking in fog
With mother and brothers in sand we did slog,
Along the spit to Morro Rock one March day,
Relaxed, exhilarated, refreshed, and at play.


We sat on the dunes with the waves in our ears,
And sipped our sweet coffees all in good cheer,
Our toes in the sand, we laughed till we cried,
Then all sat in silence as the years drifted by.


I stirred, awakened, wondered where I could be;
Inside or Outside; a dream, or faded memory.


Michael P. Garofalo,  One Short of a Baker's Dozen


Friday, May 24, 2019

Springtime Spectacular

Yesterday, Karen and I visited Schreiner's Iris Gardens and Adelman Peony Gardens in the northeast Salem and Woodburn areas of Oregon.  The rural farm areas of the Willamette Valley are all lush green this time of year.  We drove back by 99E through Canby into Oregon City.  A delightful adventure.









Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Front Yard Gardening


We have been slowly making improvements and expanding our front yard garden area.




Thursday, April 11, 2019

Waving Hands Like Clouds

Cloud Hands is a common movement sequence in Tai Chi Chuan.
It is called "Yun Shou."

Your arms move in soft flowing motions from side to side across the body.  One hand is higher than the other.  The feet move gracefully and deliberately, mostly to the left.  The patterns repeat three or four times.

Some of these same movements are executed in more forceful and much faster kung fu styles as back fists, blocks, elbow strikes, slaps, diversions, grabs, joint locks, bagua spins, etc.

Just as there are slow quiet songs, there are fast loud songs.  Both are music.

Whole books, articles, and videotaped lectures and demonstrations about Moving Hands Like Clouds or Cloud Hands are available for further study on the subject.

Delightfully, Cloud Hands can be practiced while you are seated.  It gently stretches the waist, shoulders, back, and neck.  It is simple and fun to play in this way.

Cloud Hands is practiced in Taijiquan with ease, softness, grace, fluidity, balance, and quietness.  Being gentle is praised.  We try to settle into being relaxed (Sung).

Tai Chi Chuan - Cloud Hands   Website by Michael P. Garofalo


Wednesday, April 10, 2019

I Tripped at the Hole



"Astronomers reached across intergalactic space to a giant galaxy known as Messier 87, in the constellation Virgo. There, a black hole about seven billion times more massive than the sun is unleashing a violent jet of energy some 5,000 light years into space."
- New York Times, April 10, 2019




Oil drillers dig holes into the earth that release gas and oil energies.  Not the same as the astronomer's "Black Holes"; but names vary as realities and our living interactions and language games vary or are sustained with others.    

Today, I will dig a hole into our back yard black soil, along our vertical trellis, and then plant a third evergreen clematis vine.  The plant will flourish in that black hole.

Last week a dermatological surgeon incised a squamous tumor from in my left hand, and covered the wound with 10 stitches.  Healed well, and I can return to lifting more than 10 pounds today.  It was a red hole in my flesh for a brief time.  

I've looked down into that multicolored hole called the Grand Canyon and the green Columbia Gorge, big holes in the earth, all with powerful energy producing Rivers flowing Down, down, down ...

The dead human beings are often buried in black holes.  

The Universe expands and contracts in ways to tax and challenge our and my scientific imagination and understanding.  

Yin and Yang, Emptinesses and Energies.  

 

Sunday, March 31, 2019

Chapter 33, Tao Te Ching, Lao Tzu

Dao De Jing, Lao Tzu
Chapter 33


"One who knows others is clever, but one who knows himself is enlightened.
One who conquers others is powerful, but one who conquers himself is mighty.
One who knows contentment is rich and one who pushes with vigor has will.
One who loses not his place endures.
One who may die but will not perish, has life everlasting."
-  Translated by Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki and Paul Carus, 1913, Chapter 33 



"It is wisdom to know others;
It is enlightenment to know one's self.
The conqueror of men is powerful;
The master of himself is strong.
It is wealth to be content;
It is willful to force one's way on others.
Endurance is to keep one's place;
Long life it is to die and not perish."
-  Translated by R. B. Blakney, 1955, Chapter 33   



"He who knows others is wise;
He who knows himself is enlightened.
He who conquers others is strong;
He who conquers himself is mighty.
He who knows contentment is rich.
He who keeps on his course with energy has will.
He who does not deviate from his proper place will long endure.
He who may die but not perish has longevity."
-  Translated by Ch'u Ta-Kao, 1904, Chapter 33 





"Know others by knowing yourself.
Overcome others by overcoming yourself.
Understanding what is enough is enough.
Presence is perseverance.
Coming to stillness is forging ahead.
Find life by accepting death."
-  Translated by Starwell Crispin, Chapter 33 


知人者智.
自知者明.
勝人者有力.
自勝者強.
知足者富.
強行者有志.
不失其所者久.
死而不亡者壽.  

-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 33 


zhi ren zhe zhi.
zi zhi zhe ming.
sheng ren zhe you li.
zi sheng zhe qiang.
zhi zu zhe fu.
qiang xing zhe you zhi.
bu shi qi suo zhe jiu.
si er bu wang zhe shou.
- Pinyin Romanization, Daodejing, Chapter 33



"He who knows others is intelligent;
he who understands himself is enlightened;
he who is able to conquer others has force,
but he who is able to control himself is mighty.
He who appreciates contentment is wealthy.
He who dares to act has nerve;
if he can maintain his position he will endure,
but he, who dying does not perish, is immortal."
-  Translated by Dwight Goddard, 1919, Chapter 33  




"Knowledge frequently results
from knowing others,
but the man who is awakened,
has seen the uncarved block.
Others might be mastered by force,
but to master one's self
requires the Tao.
He who has many material things,
may be described as rich,
but he who knows he has enough,
and is at one with the Tao,
might have enough of material things,
and have self-being as well.
Will-power may bring perseverance;
but to have tranquility is to endure,
being protected for all his days.
He whose ideas remain in the world,
is present for all time."
-  Translated by Stan Rosenthal, 1984, Chapter 33  




"Quien conoce a los demás es inteligente.
Quien se conoce a sí mismo tiene visión interna.
Quien conquista a los demás tiene fuerza; quien se conquista a sí mismo es realmente poderoso.
Quien sabe cuándo ha obtenido bastante es rico, y quien sigue asiduamente
     el sendero del Tao es alguien de propósito constante.
Quien permanece en el lugar en el que ha encontrado su verdadera casa vive mucho tiempo,
     y quien muere, pero no perece, goza de la auténtica longevidad."
-  Translation from Chinese to English by John C. H. Wu, translated into Spanish by Alfonso Colodrón, Capitulo 33 




"Knowing others makes you smart, but knowing yourself makes you wise.
To rule others, you must be powerful, but to rule yourself, you must be strong.
If you have only what you need, you have true wealth.
If you never give up, you will find a way.
If you stay true to yourself, you will never be lost.
If you live your entire life, you’ve really lived."
-  Translated by Ron Hogan, 1995, Chapter 33



A typical webpage created by Mike Garofalo for each one of the 81 Chapters (Verses, Sections) of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) includes 25 different English language translations or interpolations for that Chapter, 5 Spanish language translations for that Chapter, the Chinese characters for that Chapter, the Wade-Giles and Hanyu Pinyin transliterations (Romanization) of the Mandarin Chinese words for that Chapter, and 2 German and 1 French translation of that Chapter.  Each webpage for each one of the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching includes extensive indexing by key words, phrases, and terms for that Chapter in English, Spanish, and the Wade-Giles Romanization.  Each webpage on a Chapter of the Daodejing includes recommended reading in books and websites, a detailed bibliography, some commentary, research leads, translation sources, a Google Translate drop down menu, and other resources for that Chapter.  These are hypertext documents, and available online under Creative Commons 4.

Chapter 33, Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu. Complied by Mike Garofalo.

Chapter and Thematic Index (Concordance) to the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu


Concordance, Alphabetical Subject Index, Chapters 1-25

English Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index

Spanish Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: A Selected Reading List

A Solitary Daoist Neopagan's Final Journey

An Old Philosopher's Notebooks

How to Live a Good Life: Advice from Wise Persons







Friday, March 22, 2019

First Day of Spring


"Last day of Winter,
leafless walnut trees─
form is emptiness.
First day of Spring,
clear sky to Mt. Shasta─
emptiness is form."
 
-  Michael P. Garofalo
   Cuttings: March




Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Retail Gardens Thriving

We shop at retail gardens in the northeast area of Vancouver, Washington.

Today, I visited Lowe's on 117th Ave and 78th St.  Their gardening area was well stocked with many kinds of plants, shrubs, starters, colors, seeds, sizes, soils, bricks, wood, and equipment.  Today, I purchased a hanging basket with colorful flowers, a heather plant in bloom, and six bricks.  Karen and I will return tomorrow.

A few days ago we visited Yard and Garden on NE Hwy 99.  I plan to visit my nearby Home Depot on Andresson and 78th St.  Even our local Fred Meyer Supermarket, across from Lowes, has a well stocked gardening area.

This Springtime Gardening Extravagance of plants and gardening supplies is inspiring to me.  The colors are enlivening.  Exhuberance of Green Beings-- all in Monrovia Nursery containers.

We have also shopped at many nurseries in Portland and up in Woodland (Tsusagawa) and up elsewhere in Washington.




Sunday, March 17, 2019

Happy Birthday Karen Garofalo

Best wishes for good health, well being, and happiness in your 7th Decade of Life.  I love you!

Also, a joyful St. Patrick's Day.

A family dinner tonight: corn beef sandwiches, potato salad, cole slaw, and Irish Whiskey.

Yesterday, Saturday, we all went to McMenamins restaurant in Kalama, Washington.  The new restaurant and hotel are adjacent to the Columbia River in Kalama along the levy.  Here is a photo of the three generations of ladies in our family




Saturday, March 16, 2019

Back Ache Problems

For the last two months I have been trying to recover from re-injuring the middle of my upper back and neck, primarily on the right side under the shoulder blade.  All the usual remedies such as resting, massage, heat packs, cold packs, analgesic cream, gentle stretching, and extra sleep have been tried.

I injured his area while in my 30's while weightlifting.  I have had this area re-injuring numerous times in the decades since. 

This recent flare up has been a discouraging and painful at times.  Hopefully, I might someday heal this injury.  I am sure the injury is now, at age 73, compounded by arthritis problems.

Hoping for the best!

Friday, March 15, 2019

Dao De Jing, Laozi, Chapter 32

Tao Te Ching, by Lao Tzu

Chapter 32


"The Way is eternally nameless,
Though simplicity is small, the world cannot subordinate it.
If lords and monarchs can keep to it, all beings will naturally resort to them.
Heaven and earth combine, thus showering sweet dew.
No humans command it; it is even by nature.
The Way is to the world as rivers and oceans to valley streams."
-  Translated by Thomas Cleary, 1991, Chapter 32



"The Tao of the Absolute has no name.
Although infinitesimal in its Simplicity,
The world cannot master it.
If leaders would hold on to it,
All Things would naturally follow.
Heaven and Earth would unite to rain Sweet Dew,
And people would naturally cooperate without commands.
Names emerge when institutions begin.
When names emerge, know likewise to stop.
To know when to stop is to be free of danger.
The presence of the Tao in the world
Is like the valley stream joining the rivers and seas."

-  Translated by R. L. Wing, 1986, Chapter 32


"The Way eternal has no name.
A block of wood untooled, though small,
May still excel in the world.
And if the king and nobles could
Retain its potency for good,
Then everything would freely give
Allegiance to their rule.
The earth and sky would then conspire
To bring the sweet dew down;
And evenly it would be given
To folk without constraining power.
Creatures came to be with order's birth,
And once they had appeared,
Came also knowledge of repose,
And with that was security.
In this world,
Compare those of the Way
To torrents that flow
Into river and sea."
-   Translated by Raymond B. Blakney, 1955, Chapter 32   



"The Tao remains eternally unnamable.
As undivided simplicity,
If it resides in an ordinary person,
nobody in the world can subjugate him;
If an influential person abides by it,
everybody in the world will be drawn to him.
When heaven and earth come together in harmony,
Showering the world equally with the sweet rain of undivided simplicity,
People cooperate voluntarily without any governing rules.
When simplicity is divided, names come into existence.
When names are already there, the process of further division should stop,
For to know when to stop
is to avoid the danger of complexity.
The Tao is to the world
what the ocean is to the rivers of the earth."
-  Translated by Yasuhiko Genku Kimura, Chapter 32   



"Tao, the Eternally Nameless.
Though primordial simplicity is infinitesimal, none dare make it a public servant.
Were princes and monarchs able to maintain it, all creation would spontaneously submit.
Heaven and earth harmonized, there would be an abundance of nourishing agencies; the people unbidden, would cooperate of their own accord.
Names arose when differentiation commenced; once there were names it became important to know where to stop.
This being known, danger ceased.
The Tao spread throughout the world, may be compared to mountain rivulets and streams flowing toward the sea."
-  Translated by C. Spurgeon Medhurst, 1905, Chapter 32 



道常無名.
樸雖小, 天下莫能臣也.
侯王若能守之, 萬物將自賓.
天地相合, 以降甘露, 民莫之令而自均.
始制有名.
名亦既有.
夫亦將知止.
知止所以不殆.
譬道之在天下.
猶川谷之與江海.
-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 32



tao ch'ang wu ming.
p'u sui hsiao, t'ien hsia mo nêng ch'ên yeh.
hou wang jo nêng shou chih, wan wu chiang tzu pin.
t'ien ti hsiang ho, yi chiang kan lu, min mo chih ling erh tzu chün.
shih chih yu ming.
ming yi chi yu.
fu yi chiang chih chih.
chih chih so k'o pu tai.
p'i tao chih tsai t'ien hsia.
yu ch'uan ku chih yü chiang hai.

-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 32 



"The eternal Tao is nameless; though it be
Too insignificant a name to have,
In its primordial simplicity
The whole world dare not make of it a slave.
If prince or king could keep it, everything
Would homage pay to him spontaneously,
And Heaven and Earth, combined, sweet dews would bring,
And people know no rule but harmony.
But when it takes control, it has a name,
And, knowing when to stop, men rest at ease,
For to the Tao the whole world is the same
s river streams compared with mighty seas."
-  Translated by Isaac Winter Heysinger, 1903, Chapter 32

"Tao is forever of no name.
Small as it may be,
Tao as the uncarved block cannot be used by anyone in the universe.
If kings and lords could follow it well,
Ten Thousand Things will spontaneously obey them.
Heaven and earth would make love to each other,
Sweet dew will thereby fall gently.
With no decrees, people will be naturally ruled.
When the whole uncarved block is divided,
The pieces become instruments and in need of their names.
When there are already many names,
It is also necessary to know their limitations.
When their limitations are known,
There are no things in danger.
Tao is manifest in the universe,
Like the water flows from the rivers and the valleys into Yan Ze River and ocean."
-  Translated by Eichi Shimomisse, 1998, Chapter 32  

   

"El Tao es eterno.
El Tao no tiene nombre.
Pequeño es en su perfecta simplicidad primera.
Pequeño como es, el mundo entero es incapaz de aprehenderlo.
Si sólo príncipes y reyes pudieran aprehenderlo tendrían el mundo en la palma de la mano.
La tierra y el cielo estando unidos harían caer la lluvia como un suave rocío.
La paz y el orden reinarían espontáneamente entre los hombres sin necesidad de estar sometidos a un mando.
Cuando la perfecta simplicidad primero se diversificó, aparecieron los nombres.
Apareciendo los nombres, el Tao no se quedó en ellos.
El saber detenerse es estar sin peligros.
Compara El Tao con la existencia universal.
El Tao es como un riachuelo y un valle frente al gran río y al mar."
-  Translation from Logia Medio Dia, 2015, Capítulo 32 



"Tao has always been nameless;
an Uncarved Block, simple and small, but subject to none under Heaven.
All things will obey the Monarch who defends it.
Heaven uniting with Earth, as sweet dew falling.
People not commanded, but true to themselves.
First there were names, then more names.
It is time to stop.
Knowing when to stop avoids exhaustion.
Tao flows from Heaven, as Rivers flow into the Sea."
-  Translated by Karl Kromal, 2002, Chapter 32  



"The Tao is nameless and unchanging. 
Although it appears insignificant,
nothing in the world can contain it.
If a ruler abides by its principles,
then her people will willingly follow.
Heaven would then reign on earth,
like sweet rain falling on paradise.
People would have no need for laws,
because the law would be written on their hearts.
Naming is a necessity for order,
but naming can not order all things.
Naming often makes things impersonal,
so we should know when naming should end.
Knowing when to stop naming,
you can avoid the pitfall it brings.
All things end in the Tao
just as the small streams and the largest rivers
flow through valleys to the sea."
-  Translated by John H. McDonald, 1996, Chapter 32 




A typical webpage created by Mike Garofalo for each one of the 81 Chapters (Verses, Sections) of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) includes 25 different English language translations or interpolations for that Chapter, 5 Spanish language translations for that Chapter, the Chinese characters for that Chapter, the Wade-Giles and Hanyu Pinyin transliterations (Romanization) of the Mandarin Chinese words for that Chapter, and 2 German and 1 French translation of that Chapter.  Each webpage for each one of the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching includes extensive indexing by key words, phrases, and terms for that Chapter in English, Spanish, and the Wade-Giles Romanization.  Each webpage on a Chapter of the Daodejing includes recommended reading in books and websites, a detailed bibliography, some commentary, research leads, translation sources, a Google Translate drop down menu, and other resources for that Chapter.  These are hypertext documents, and available online under Creative Commons 4.

Chapter 32, Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu. Complied by Mike Garofalo.

Chapter and Thematic Index (Concordance) to the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu


Concordance, Alphabetical Subject Index, Chapters 1-25.

English Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index

Spanish Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: A Selected Reading List

A Solitary Daoist Neopagan's Final Journey

An Old Philosopher's Notebooks

How to Live a Good Life: Advice from Wise Persons






    

Thursday, March 14, 2019

Mossy Grave


"The smell of the sea hugged the fog in the redwood trees,
All cool and dank, dimly lit and rank with green,
And in shadowed limbs the Stellar jays jabbered free,
And me, standing silently, an alien in this enchanted scene.

From behind the mossy grey stumps
the sounds of footsteps crunching fronds of ferns
caught my suddenly wary mind ...
What?

"Hello, old friend," said Chang San Feng.
"Master Chang, what a surprise," said I.
Master Chang sat on a stump, smiled, and said,

"Can you hear the Blue Dragon singing in the decaying tree;
Or is it the White Tiger roaring in the wilderness of your bright white skull?
No matter! The answer is in the questioning; don't you Chan men see?

In the red ball flesh of this decaying tree
Sapless woody shards of centuries of seasons
Nourish the new roots of mindfulness sprouting.
Yes, Yes, but how can it be?
The up-surging waves of life sprout forth from the decaying tree,
As sure as sunrise rolling over the deep black sea.
Coming, coming, endlessly coming; waves of Chi.

Tan Qian's raven roosts for 10,000 moons
in the withered branches of the rotting tree;
then, one day, the weathered tree falls,
nobody hearing, soundlessly crashing
on the forest floor, on some unknown noon.

Over and over, over and over, life bringing death, death bringing life,
Beyond even the miraculous memories of an old Xian like me;
Watching, watching, sequestered from the strife,
Turning my soul away sometimes because I cannot bear to see.

Even minds may die, but Mind is always free
Bounding beyond, beyond, far beyond you and me;
Somehow finding the Possibility Keys
And unlocking the Door out of the Voids of Eternities."

Master Chang somehow, someway,
slowly disappeared into the red brown heart of the decaying tree.

Then the squawk of the jay
opened my mind's eye to the new day -
Namaste."

- Michael P. Garofalo
  Meetings with Master Chang San Feng
  Remembering Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park, California