Friday, April 28, 2017

Tao Te Ching, Chapter 2

Dao De Jing, Laozi   
Chapter 2


"When the world speaks of beauty as being beautiful, ugliness is at once defined.
When goodness is seen to be good, evil is at once apparent.
So do existence and non-existence mutually give rise to one another,
As that which is difficult and that which is easy, distant and near, high and low,
shrill and bass, preceding and following.
The Sage therefore is occupied only with that which is without prejudice.
He teaches without verbosity; he acts without effort; he produces with possessing,
he acts without regard to the fruit of action; he brings his work to perfection without assuming credit;
and claiming nothing as his own, he cannot at any time be said to lose."
-  Translated by Walter Gorn Old, 1904, Chapter 2  



"When all the people of the world know beauty as beauty,
There arises the recognition of ugliness.
When they all know the good as good,
There arises the recognition of evil.
Therefore: Being and non-being produce each other;
Difficult and easy complete each other;
Long and short contrast each other;
High and low distinguish each other;
Sound and voice harmonize each other;
Front and behind accompany each other.
Therefore the sage manages affairs without action
And spreads doctrines without words.
All things arise, and he does not turn away from them.
He produces them but does not take possession of them.
He acts but does not rely on his own ability.
He accomplishes his task but does not claim credit for it.
It is precisely because he does not claim credit that his accomplishment remains with him."
-  Translated by Wang Tsit Chan, 1963, Chapter 2 



"Recognize beauty and ugliness is born.
Recognize good and evil is born.
Is and Isn't produce each other.
Hard depends on easy,
Long is tested by short,
High is determined by low,
Sound is harmonized by voice,
After is followed by before.
Therefore the sage is devoted to non action,
Moves without teaching,
Creates ten thousand things without instruction,
Lives but does not own,
Acts but does not presume,
Accomplishes without taking credit.
When no credit is taken,
Accomplishment endures."
-  Translated by Stephen Addis, 1993, Chapter 2   



"When all in the world understand beauty to be beautiful, then ugliness exists.
When all understand goodness to be good, then evil exists.
Thus existence suggests non-existence;
Easy gives rise to difficult;
Short is derived from long by comparsion;
Low is derived from high by position;
Resonance harmonises sound;
After follows before.
Therefore the sage carries on his business without action, and gives his teaching without words."
-  Translated by Ch'u Ta-Kao, 1904, Chapter 2 




"It is the world of man that defines ugly by comparing it with that which man calls beautiful.
Skillful is considered such by comparison to that which is called 'without skill'.
Alive and non-alive are delineated by nature.
Difficult and easy are abstracted by our perception.
Long and short are defined by the one against the other.
High and low are reckoned so by the contrast of the one with the other.
Music is seen as pleasing if the notes and tones are recognized as being harmonious with each other.
One in front, and one behind are recognized as one following the other.
It is for this reason that the sage lives in the condition of wu-wei (unattached action, or; doing-not doing),
And teaches without words.
He knows that names and images are fleeting, and all things will transform.
One who seems to follow tonight might lead another time.
He sees all that is done as neither large nor small.
All things are neither grand nor miniscule.
Actions are neither difficult, nor done with ease. He acts without expectation.
Things spring up around him, and he accepts them, but does not possess them.
Things go away, and he recognizes their departure without grief or joy.
When the work is done he leaves it be.
Because he does not dwell in it, it will last."
-  Translated by Rivenrock, Chapter 2  




"Beauty becomes recognized as beauty,
As its difference from ugliness is seen.
Likewise,
Goodness and love become recognized,
As their difference from evil and hatred is felt.

The Relationship of:
- Being and non-being is known through life and growth.
- Difficult and easy is known through achievement and completion.
- Long and short is known through form and contrast.
- High and low is known through relationship and position.
- Sound and voice is known through amplitude and harmony.
- Front and behind is known through position and sequence.

Thus:
Wu-Wei graces the affairs of the Sage -
Teaching gracefully, Without words.
Receiving all happening as natural,
Without needing to judge or control.
Giving life and animation to all experience
Without needing to dominate.
Accomplishing, Without expecting reward.

In never assuming importance,
When the Sage's work is complete,
It remains, everlastingly."
-  Translated by Alan B. Taplow, 1982, Chapter 2  


天下皆知美之為美, 斯惡已.
皆知善之為善, 斯不善已.
故有無相生.
難易相成.
長短相較.
高下相傾.
音聲相和.
前後相隨.
是以聖人處無為之事.
行不言之教.
萬物作焉而不辭.
生而不有.
為而不恃.
功成而弗居.
夫唯弗居.
是以不去.
-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 2 



t'ien hsia chieh chih mei chih wei mei, ssu wu yi.
chieh chih shan chih wei shan, ssu pu shan yi.
ku yu wu hsiang shêng.
nan yi hsiang ch'êng.
ch'ang tuan hsiang chiao.
kao hsia hsiang ch'ing.
yin shêng hsiang ho.
ch'ien hou hsiang sui.
shih yi shêng jen ch'u wu wei chih shih.
hsing pu yen chih chiao.
wan wu tso yen erh pu tz'u.
shêng erh pu yu.
wei erh pu shih.
kung ch'eng erh fu chü.
fu wei fu ch'u.
shih yi pu ch'ü
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 2 





"When everyone knows what beauty is,
There must also be ugliness.
When everybody knows what goodness is,
Then evil must also exist.
Therefore, the haves and the have-nots coexist.
Easy and hard become complementary.
Long and short differ in length.
High and low contrast in height.
Tone and pitch harmonise with each other.
The past is followed by the present.
Hence, the sage manages his affairs with non-action,
Teaches without utterance,
And lets everything develop without any interference.
Dao procreates but does not possess.
It facilitates development but does not gloat.
When it accomplishes his task, it does not claim credit.
As the sage does not claim credit for his success,
The credit cannot be taken away from him."
-  Translated by Han Hiong Tan, Chapter 2  


"Cuando se reconoce la Belleza en el Mundo
Se aprende lo que es la Fealdad;
Cuando se reconoce la Bondad en el Mundo
Se aprende lo que es la Maldad.

De este modo:
Vida y muerte son abstracciones del crecimiento;
Dificultad y facilidad son abstracciones del progreso;
Cerca y lejos son abstracciones de la posición;
Fuerza y debilidad son abstracciones del control;
Música y habla son abstracciones de la armonía;
Antes y después son abstracciones de la secuencia.

El sabio controla sin autoridad,
Y enseña sin palabras;
Él deja que todas las cosas asciendan y caigan,
Nutre, pero no interfiere,
Dá sin pedirle,
Y está satisfecho."
-  Translated by Antonio Rivas Gonzálvez, 2004, Capítulo 2


"The whole world knows: when beauty tries to be beautiful it changes into ugliness by that very fact.
The whole world knows: when kindness tries to appear kind it changes into unkindness by that very fact.
So close are Being and Non-Being that one arises from the other.
So suddenly easy becomes difficult short becomes long high becomes low loud becomes soundless the first becomes the last.
That is why the Sage strives to act without action to teach without speaking.
He lets things happen and does not try to stay them.
He labors and is not greedy.
He acts and does not demand anything.
He receives and does not retain anything."
-  Translated by K.O. Schmidt, 1975, Chapter 2  


"Because the world recognized beauty as beauty, ugliness is known to be ugly.
Everyone knows goodness to be goodness, and to know this is to know what is not good.
Similarly, existence implies non-existence;
The hard and the easy complement each other; We recognize what is long by comparison with what is short;
High by comparison with low;
The shrill by comparison with the sonorous.
Before and after, earlier and later, back and front -
All these complement one another.
Therefore the Sage, the self-controlled man, dwells in action-less activity, poised between contraries.
He teaches without employing words.
He beholds al things that have been made - he does not turn his back on them.
He achieves, but does not claim merit;
He does not call attention to what he does, not claim success.
Regarding nothing as his own, he loses nothing that is his."
-  Translated by Herman Ould, 1946, Chapter 2 





"When people see things as beautiful,
ugliness is created.
When people see things as good,
evil is created.

Being and non-being produce each other.
Difficult and easy complement each other.
Long and short define each other.
High and low oppose each other.
Fore and aft follow each other.

Therefore the Master
can act without doing anything
and teach without saying a word.
Things come her way and she does not stop them;
things leave and she lets them go.
She has without possessing,
and acts without any expectations.
When her work is done, she take no credit.
hat is why it will last forever."
-  Translated by John H. McDonald, 1996, Chapter 2   



A typical webpage created by Mike Garofalo for each one of the 81 Chapters (Verses, Sections) of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) includes 25 different English language translations or interpolations for that Chapter, 5 Spanish language translations for that Chapter, the Chinese characters for that Chapter, the Wade-Giles and Hanyu Pinyin transliterations (Romanization) of the Mandarin Chinese words for that Chapter, and 2 German and 1 French translation of that Chapter.  Each webpage for each one of the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching includes extensive indexing by key words, phrases, and terms for that Chapter in English, Spanish, and the Wade-Giles Romanization.  Each webpage on a Chapter of the Daodejing includes recommended reading in books and websites, a detailed bibliography, some commentary, research leads, translation sources, a Google Translate drop down menu, and other resources for that Chapter.  These are hypertext documents, and available online under Creative Commons 4.

  

Chapter 2, Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu.  Compiled and indexed by Mike Garofalo.  

Chapter and Thematic Index (Concordance) to the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu


English Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index


Spanish Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index


Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices


Taoism: A Selected Reading List







   

   

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Ten Golden Rules

Ten Golden Rules for Living the Good Life
  
“1. Examine life, engage life with vengeance; always search for new pleasures and new destines to reach with your mind.

 2.  Worry only about the things that are in your control
the things that can be influenced and changed by your actions, not about the things that are beyond your capacity to direct or alter.  

 3.  Treasure Friendship, the reciprocal attachment that fills the need for affiliation. Friendship cannot be acquired in the market place, but must be nurtured and treasured in relations imbued with trust and amity.  

 4.  Experience True Pleasure
Avoid shallow and transient pleasures. Keep your life simple. Seek calming pleasures that contribute to peace of mind. True pleasure is disciplined and restrained.  

 5.  Master Yourself. Resist any external force that might delimit thought and action; stop deceiving yourself, believing only what is personally useful and convenient; complete liberty necessitates a struggle within, a battle to subdue negative psychological and spiritual forces that preclude a healthy existence; self mastery requires ruthless cador.  

 6.  Avoid Excess. Live life in harmony and balance. Avoid excesses. Even good things, pursued or attained without moderation, can become a source of misery and suffering.  

 7.  Be a Responsible Human Being
Approach yourself with honesty and thoroughness; maintain a kind of spiritual hygiene; stop the blame-shifting for your errors and shortcomings.  

 8.  Don’t Be a Prosperous Fool. Prosperity by itself, is not a cure-all against an ill-led life, and may be a source of dangerous foolishness. Money is a necessary but not a sufficient condition for the good life, for happiness and wisdom.  

 9.  Don’t Do Evil to Others. Evildoing is a dangerous habit, a kind of reflex too quickly resorted to and too easily justified that has a lasting and damaging effect upon the quest for the good life. Harming others claims two victims—the receiver of the harm, and the victimizer, the one who does harm.  

 10.  Kindness towards others tends to be rewarded
Kindness to others is a good habit that supports and reinforces the quest for the good life. Helping others bestows a sense of satisfaction that has two beneficiaries—the beneficiary, the receiver of the help, and the benefactor, the one who provides the help.” 


-   By M. A. Soupious and Panos Mourdoukoutas, The Ten Golden Rules: Ancient Wisdom from the Greek Philosophers on Living the Good Life, 2009. 



Monday, April 24, 2017

Be a Loner



"Be a loner. That gives you time to wonder, to search for the truth. Have holy curiosity. Make your life worth living."
- Albert Einstein


How to Live a Good Life: http://www.egreenway.com/reason/advice.htm

Friday, April 21, 2017

Dao De Jing, Chapter 3


Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu
Chapter 3


"If no distinctions of superiority and inferiority prevail among officers, they will devote themselves to their tasks rather than to rivalries with one another.
If no special value is placed upon rare things, one will have no incentive for stealing them.
If nothing appears to arouse envy, one will remain satisfied with things as they are
Since this is so, the wise administrator does not lead people to set their hearts upon what they cannot have, but satisfies their inner needs. He does not promote ambition to improve their status, but supports their self-sufficiency. He does not complicate their lives with knowledge of multifarious details or with an urge to attend to this, that and the other.
By keeping people contented, he prevents those who mistakenly believe that ambition is better than contentment from leading the contented astray.
By being calm and contented himself, he sets an example for his people."
-  Translated by Archie J. Bahm, 1958, Chapter 3  



"Not exalting ability ensures that the people do not strive.
Not prizing goods that are difficult to obtain ensures that the people do not become robbers.
Not showing them what they might desire ensures that the people do not feel disturbed in their hearts.
Therefore the Saint, in the exercise of government, empties their hearts and fills their bellies, weakens their wills and strengthens their bones, thus constantly ensuring that the people are without knowledge and without desires and that those who have knowledge dare not act.
He practices Non-action and consequently there is nothing that is not well governed."
-  Translated by Jan J. L. Duyvendak, 1954, Chapter 3  



"When you praise people for their achievements, people will compete
When you call things valuable, people will steal
When people flaunt desirable things, it will make other people restless
Therefore the sage sets himself to the task of emptying their heads
To make sure they're not hungry, discourage their ambitions and strengthen their bodies
So people will be without anxiety and without the desire for knowledge
And the scientists will be played off the field
When people won't labour anymore
All will live in peace."
-  Translated by Anonymous, Chapter 3  




"Rewarding not the talented from fierce contention frees,
With wealth unprized, the people will not take to thievish arts,
Not seeing what awakes desire will keep the mind at ease,
And so the sage' s governing unloads the people' s hearts.
He fills the stomach, strengthens bones, and calms the daring will,
He causes people not to know desires they should not hold,
And those who know of such he keeps, from reckless daring, still,
He acts the nothing acting, and there' s nothing uncontrolled."
-  Translated by Isaac Winter Heysinger, 1903, Chapter 3  




不尚賢, 使民不爭; 不貴難得之貨, 使民不為盜.
不見可欲, 使心不亂.
是以聖人之治.
虛其心.
實其腹.
弱其志.
強其骨.
常使民無知無欲.
使夫知者不敢為也.
為無為.
則無不治.
-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 3  


pu shang hsien, shih min pu chêng; pu kuei nan tê chih huo, shih min pu wei tao.
pu chien k'o yü, shih min hsin pu luan.
shih yi shêng jên chih chih. 
hsü ch'i hsin.
shih ch'i fu.
jo ch'i chih.
ch'iang ch'i ku.
ch'ang shih min wu chih wu yü. 
shih fu chih chê pu kan wei yeh. 
wei wu wei.
tsê wu pu chih.
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 3  


"If those who are excellent find no preferment,
The people will cease to contend for promotion.
If goods that are hard to obtain are not favored,
The people will cease to turn robbers or bandits.
If things much desired are kept under cover,
Disturbance will cease in the minds of the people.
The Wise Man's policy, accordingly,
Will be to empty people's hearts and minds,
To fill their bellies, weaken their ambition,
Give them sturdy frames and always so,
To keep them uniformed, without desire,
And knowing ones not venturing to act.
Be still while you work
And keep full control
Over all."
-  Translated by Raymond Blakney, 1955, Chapter 3  



"Exalt not the wise, 
So that the people shall not scheme and contend;
Prize not rare objects,
So that the people shall not steal;
Shut out from site the things of desire,
So that the people's hearts shall not be disturbed.
Therefore in the government of the Sage:
He keeps empty their hearts
Makes full their bellies,
Discourages their ambitions,
Strengthens their frames;
So that the people may be innocent of knowledge and desires.
And the cunning ones shall not presume to interfere.
By action without deeds
May all live in peace."
-  Translated by Lin Yutang, 1955, Chapter 3  



"Si no se eleva a los hombres de mérito,
no habrá disputas entre el pueblo.
Si no se valoran los objetos difíciles de conseguir,
no existirán ladrones en el pueblo.
Si no se deja ver lo que puede provocar el deseo,
no se producirán disturbios populares.
Por eso el gobierno del sabio es:
vaciar la mente del pueblo,
y llenar su estómago;
debilitar su ambición,
y fortalecer sus huesos.
Hacer siempre que el pueblo no tenga conocimientos, ni deseos.
Hacer que los inteligentes no se atrevan (a gobernar);
no actuar, en una palabra,
y entonces reinará el orden universal."
-  Translated by Juan Ignacio Preciado, 1978, Tao Te Ching, Capítulo 3 



"When the superior are not exalted, envy will not be aroused.
Then there will be no rivalry or contention among people.
When wealth is not treasured, desire for possessions will not be stirred up.
Then people will not be tempted to rob one another.
By shutting that which is desirable out of sight, the heart will remain undisturbed.
Then there will be no confusion in the hearts of people.
The guidance of the Universal One of natural wholeness is therefore:
Empty your mind.
Enjoy good health.
Weaken your ambitions.
Strengthen your essence.
When people are free from cunning, desire, and artifice, everything will be well-ordered of its own accord."
-  Translated by Ni Hua-Ching, 1995, Chapter 3



"Bestowing honor breeds ambitions.
 Hoarding treasure invites thieves.
 Displaying objects of desire sows the seeds of discontent.
 Therefore the sage governs
 by emptying minds and filling bellies,
 by weakening wills and strengthening bones.
 He extols the virtue of desireless unknowing
 and keeps intellects off balance.
 When not-doing is accomplished,
 nothing remains undone."
 -  Translated by Bart Marshall, 2006, Chapter 3




A typical webpage created by Mike Garofalo for each one of the 81 Chapters (Verses, Sections) of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) includes 25 different English language translations or interpolations for that Chapter, 5 Spanish language translations for that Chapter, the Chinese characters for that Chapter, the Wade-Giles and Hanyu Pinyin transliterations (Romanization) of the Mandarin Chinese words for that Chapter, and 2 German and 1 French translation of that Chapter.  Each webpage for each one of the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching includes extensive indexing by key words, phrases, and terms for that Chapter in English, Spanish, and the Wade-Giles Romanization.  Each webpage on a Chapter of the Daodejing includes recommended reading in books and websites, a detailed bibliography, some commentary, research leads, translation sources, a Google Translate drop down menu, and other resources for that Chapter.  These are hypertext documents, and available online under Creative Commons 4.

  

Chapter 3, Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu.  Compiled and indexed by Mike Garofalo.  

Chapter and Thematic Index (Concordance) to the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu


English Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index


Spanish Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index


Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices


Taoism: A Selected Reading List







Wednesday, April 19, 2017

What Runs But Never Gets Tired?

The annual average rainfall (AAR) in the different places I have lived is of note for me:

1946-1967  Unincorporated East Los Angeles, Bandini Neighborhood/Varrio,
                  City of Commerce, Southern California   
AAR = 15”
1948-1958  Karen grew up in Alexandria, Central Indiana   AAR = 42"

1969-1973  Biloxi, Mississippi   AAR = 65”
1973-1983  Bell Gardens, Southern California   AAR =  15”
1983-1998  Hacienda Heights, California   AAR = 15”
1998-2017  Red Bluff, Northern California   AAR = 25”
2017–         Vancouver, Southwestern Washington, Northwest USA  AAR = 42”


Vancouver, Washington, is rated as USDA Agricultural Zone 8B.

Zone 8b means that the average minimum winter temperature is 15 to 20 °F. 



"Ancient traditions have long associated holy wells and springs as very special places of the Goddess or anima mundi: symbolic of the Great Mother and associated with birth, the feminine principle, the universal womb, the prima materia, the waters of fertility and refreshment and the fountain of life. The dreaming sites, as they are called, have also been associated with visions, healing, and other paranormal experiences. In ancient Greece, for example, there were more than three-hundred medical centers placed at water sources, where patients experienced healing."
- Christopher and Tricia McDowell, The Sanctuary Garden, 1998, p. 62




"Day after day we looked for rain, and day after day we saw nothing but the sun. Lavender that we had planted in the spring died. The patch of grass in front of the house abandoned its ambitions to become a lawn and turned into the dirty yellow of poor straw. The earth shrank, revealing its knuckles and bones, rocks and roots that had been invisible before."
-  Peter Mayle






What runs but never gets tired?
Water


"Water is the driver of Nature."
- Leonardo da Vinci







Interstate 5 Highway Bridge from Vancouver, Washington to Portland, Oregon.  

This bridge crosses the Columbia River.  




Columbia River Valley




Mt. Hood and Hood River Valley, Oregon
The Hood River flows into the Columbia River.





Astoria, Oregon, where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean.






Monday, April 17, 2017

Beltane, Floralia, May Day, Walpurgis Nacht Preparations



"The leaves are budding across the land
on the ash and oak and hawthorn trees.
Magic rises around us in the forest
and the hedges are filled with laughter and love.
Dear Lady, we offer you a gift,
a gathering of flowers picked by our hands,
woven into the circle of endless life.
The bright colors of nature herself
blend together to honor You,
Queen of Spring,
as we give You honor this day.
Spring is here and the land is fertile,
ready to offer up gifts in Your name.
we pay you tribute, our Lady,
daughter of the Fae,
and ask Your blessing this Beltane."
- Beltane Prayers 







Beltane, May Day, Arbor Day, Green Man Celebrations
Hypertext Notebook of Mike Garofalo


"Fertility rights are ceremonies of a magic-religious nature performed to ensure the perpetuation of mankind and to control the environment. Expressed as invocations, incantations, prayers, hymns, processions, dances, and sacred dramas, these liturgical endeavors were, and still are, believed to be closely connected with the mechanisms of nature. The basis for such rites is usually a belief in sympathetic magic - that is magic worked on one level to have an effect on a different level, and based on the assumption that life and fertility, whether animal or vegetable, are one and indivisible. If such fertility rites could induce fertility in the animal and human worlds, then the vegetable world would also be stimulated to reproduction, resulting in an abundant harvest."
- Robert Ellison, The Solitary Druid, p. 130












Friday, April 14, 2017

Tao Te Ching, Chapter 4


Daodejing, Laozi
Chapter 4


"Tao is like an empty vessel,
yet use will not drain it.
Never needing to be filled,
it is the deep and unfathomable source
of the ten thousand things.

Blunt the sharpness.
Untangle the knots.
Soften the glare.
Settle like dust.
Let your wheels move only along old ruts.

Darkly visible,
it only seems as if it were there.
I know not its name.
It existed before the ten thousand things.
I call it Tao."
-  Translated by Kari Hohne, 2009, Chapter 4  




"Tao is a whirling emptiness, yet when used it cannot be exhausted.
Out of this mysterious well flows everything in existence.
Blunting sharp edges, Untangling knots, Softening the glare, It evolves us all and makes the whole world one.
Something is there, hidden and deep!
But I do not know whose child it is.
It came even before God."
-  Translated by Brian Browne Walker, 1996, Chapter 4  


"Tao is infinite.
If we use It, we find It inexhaustible,
Deep!
It appears to be Ancestor of all things.
It rounds our angles. It unravels our difficulties. It harmonizes our Light. It brings our atoms into Unity.
Pure!
It appears to be everlasting in principle.
I do not know whose Son It is,
It existed before God was manifest in Form."
-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 4 



"The Tao is like an empty bowl, 
Which in being used can never be filled up.
Fathomless, it seems to be the origin of all things.
It blunts all sharp edges,
It unties all tangles,
It harmonizes all lights,
It unites the world into one whole.
Hidden in the deeps,
Yet it seems to exist for ever.
I do not know whose child it is;
It seems to be the common ancestor of all, the father  of things."
-  Translated by John C. H. Wu, 1961, Chapter 4  




道沖而用之或不盈.
淵兮似萬物之宗.
挫其銳.
解其紛.
和其光同其塵.
湛兮似或存.
吾不知誰之子.
象帝之先.
-  Chinese characters, Chapter 4, Tao Te Ching


dao chang er yong zhi huo bu ying.
yuan xi si wan wu zhi zong.
cuo qi rui.
jie qi fen.
he qi guang tong qi chen.
zhan xi si huo cun.
wu bu zhi shui zhi zi.
xiang di zhi xian.  
-  Pinyin Romanization, Chapter 4, Daodejing





"Existence, by nothing bred,
Breeds everything.
Parent of the universe,
It smoothes rough edges,
Unties hard knots,
Tempers the sharp sun,
Lays blowing dust,
Its image in the wellspring never fails.
But how was it conceived?--this image
Of no other sire."
-  Translated by Witter Bynner, 1944, Chapter 4 



"Tao is empty, used yet never filled.
It is deep, like the forefather of all things.
It dulls sharpness, and sorts tangles,
Blends with the light, becoming one with the dust.
So serene, as if it hardly existed.
I do not know whose son it is.
It seems to have preceded God."
-  Translated by Paul J. Lin, Chapter 4 



"El Tao es como un jarrón
que el uso nunca llena.
Es iqual que un abismo,
origen de todas las cosas del mundo.

El embota cualquier filo,
El desmadeja cualquier ovillo,
El fusiona todas las cuces,
El unifica todos los polvos.

El parece muy frofundo,
parece durar siempre.
Higo de un no sé qué,
debe de ser el antepasado de los dioses."
-  Translated by Alba, 1998, Tao Te Ching, Capítulo 4 



"The subtle Way of the universe appears to lack strength,
yet its power is inexhaustible.
Fathomless, it could be the origin of all things.
It has no sharpness,
yet it rounds off all sharp edges.
It has no form,
yet it unties all tangles.
It has no glare,
yet it merges all lights.
It harmonizes all things and unites them as one integral whole.
It seems so obscure,
yet it is the Ultimate Clarity.
Whose offspring it is can never be known.
It is that which existed before any divinity."
-  Translated by Hua-Ching Ni, 1995, Chapter 4  



"Tao is an empty vessel;
it is used but never exhausted.
It is the fathomless source
of the ten thousand beings!
It blunts the sharp
and untangles the knots.
It softens the glare
and unites with the dust of the world.
It is tranquil and serene
and endures forever.
I don't know form where it comes
yet it is the ancestor of all."
-  Translated by Solala Towler, 2016, Chapter 4 



"Tao is a container
Though used again and again
It is never full
Profound!  As though the ancestor of all things

Rounding the points
Untying the knots
Softening the glare
Unifying the dust


Tranquil!  Although having a life of its own
I do not know whose child it is
It appears to have preceded the primordial ruler"
-  Translated by Dan G. Reid, 2016, Chapter 4 



"The Tao is like an empty container: 
 it can never be emptied and can never be filled.
 Infinitely deep, it is the source of all things.
 It dulls the sharp, unties the knotted,
 shades the lighted, and unites all of creation with dust.

It is hidden but always present.
 I don't know who gave birth to it.
 It is older than the concept of God."
-  Translated by John H. McDonald, 1996, Chapter 4  





A typical webpage created by Mike Garofalo for each one of the 81 Chapters (Verses, Sections) of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) includes 25 different English language translations or interpolations for that Chapter, 5 Spanish language translations for that Chapter, the Chinese characters for that Chapter, the Wade-Giles and Hanyu Pinyin transliterations (Romanization) of the Mandarin Chinese words for that Chapter, and 2 German and 1 French translation of that Chapter.  Each webpage for each one of the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching includes extensive indexing by key words, phrases, and terms for that Chapter in English, Spanish, and the Wade-Giles Romanization.  Each webpage on a Chapter of the Daodejing includes recommended reading in books and websites, a detailed bibliography, some commentary, research leads, translation sources, a Google Translate drop down menu, and other resources for that Chapter.  These are hypertext documents, and available online under Creative Commons 4.

  

Chapter 4, Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu.  Compiled and indexed by Mike Garofalo.  

Chapter and Thematic Index (Concordance) to the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu


English Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index


Spanish Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index


Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices


Taoism: A Selected Reading List






Thursday, April 13, 2017

Hello, Vancouver, WA

We moved to Vancouver, Washington, on April 10th.

We have been settling in with my daughter's family in a large Salmon Creek area home.


The usual transition issues, as with any family in a move, have occupied our time.


I have enjoyed the Portland weather, for 19 years, in four visits per per. Vancouver is across the Columbia River, north of Portland.  We live in the Columbia River Valley.  The Pacific Ocean is 80 miles from Vancouver.  So, it is cooler and cloudier and wetter here where I now live than in Red Bluff, California.  There are many naturally growing, and obviously flourishing, evergreen firs, cypress, pines, cedars, and shrubs in this area.  This week I have seen seven different trees in bloom, camillas, shrubs in bloom, tulips, etc.  


Just set up our computer and connected back online this afternoon.



Here is the view from our two room apartment, from the adjacent second story porch.  A very enjoyable place to read, stare, enjoy the gentle rain, have a smoke, drink some coffee, ponder life's obvious and obscure realities, and listen to the dull rumble (like surf at the seashore) of traffic around Interstate 5 and 139th Street.









Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Confidence

Confidence

"My confidence was big and strong
Nothing could ever go wrong.
But then, splat,
Right on the floor,
As I went running out the door,
I'm weak
and scared,
And unprepared."


By Katelyn Flinn, 5th grade

Monday, April 10, 2017

Goodbye Red Bluff CA

On April 3, 2017, we signed the escrow closing papers at the Placer Tile Company in Redding.  Our home and property in Red Bluff were finally sold.  We occupied our old home until the morning of April 10th.    

This will be my last Cloud Hands Blog post from Gushen Grove, Valley Spirit Center, Red Bluff, California.  

Today, 4/10, is the day that Karen drives our 2007 Chrysler 300 and I drive our 2003 Ford Explorer to the City of Vancouver, Clark County, State of Washington. The drive is 500 miles on Interstate 5 from Red Bluff to Vancouver.  Vancouver is on the north side of the Columbia River across from Portland, Oregon.  The City of Vancouver has about 157,000 population.  We are moving from a rural area in Northern California, population 14,000, to the Portland Metropolitan Area with over 2.2 million people.  I lived from 1946 until 1998 in Metropolitan East Los Angeles.  

Both of our cars are packed with essential belongings.  Our dog, Bruno, rides with Karen. We stop and rest , and sometimes switch cars, at the numerous clean public rest stops along I5 (e.g., Canyonville or Klamath River Crossing). We also stop and eat at restaurants along I5.  We stop at two gas stations.  




We lived for and worked for 19 years in a rural area, seven miles south of the City of Red Bluff, Tehama County, North Sacramento Valley, California; from June of 1998 until April 10, 2017.  

We enjoyed meeting new people, contributing with our coworkers, serving and educating children, making friends, serving in our community, and helping other people.  We both worked part-time for 17 years for local school districts.  

We both loved gardening on our five acres of clay soil, outdoor activities, and natural history studies.  We both enjoyed the dramatic seasonal changes in the North Sacramento Valley, California.  Our neighbors, all senior citizens, were all pleasant and freedom loving.  We sold our home to two women who support their aging grandfather, and are raising many children.  

We liked traveling and camping or moteling in Northern California from the Pacific shores near Fortuna to the high desert near Susanville (California State Highway 36); and all the mountains, forests, lakes, and valleys in between.  We visited our children and their growing families four times each year in Portland, Oregon, from 1999 to 2017.    

I enjoyed developing all of my hypertext notebooks and my Cloud Hands Blog during this period.  Each year, one to two million documents were served to people around the globe.  

I enjoyed teaching from 2002-2016 at the Tehama Family Fitness Center in Red Bluff.  Over the years, I taught yoga, tai chi chuan, qigong, mat pilates, spin cycling, Silver Sneakers, and personal fitness training.  

I enjoyed working for the Corning Union Elementary School District from 1999-2016.  I worked part-time, during the school year, as the District Librarian (Certificated) or as the Technology and Media Services Supervisor (Classified).  

Karen worked part-time for the Tehama County Department of Education for 15 years as a Special Education Instructional Assistant (Classified).     

A very positive experience of nearly two decades for both of us.  We left behind many friends, and many good students in the schools and gym in Red Bluff.  

Goodbye to our beautiful Red Bluff Home and our many delightful experiences since 1998.  

Can't turn back, life goes on, the moving finger has writ.      

Hopefully, we can arrive safely, a bit tired, in Vancouver this evening.








Sunday, April 09, 2017

Proceeding with Packing 5

Yesterday, we enjoyed a fine Spring day outdoors with some local friends.
Today, Sunday, is our final day at our old home and property in Red Bluff, California.
Tomorrow, at daybreak, we drive to Vancouver, Washington.  We are staying at our daughter's home.


























Saturday, April 08, 2017

Pan and the Green Man



"There lies within
A hidden glen
An altar made of stone.
Creeping vine
And moss entwine
To hide this ancient throne.
Tangled thorn
Grows thick to scorn
Those who seek to enter.
For though they strive
No man alive
Shall ever reach its center.
Known as Pan,
To some Green Man,
This glen is his sacred place.
He dons his hood
Of wildwood
To hide his leafy face.
The roving clans
That raped the lands,
Cut down his beloved trees.
And so, alas
As time did pass
The Green God fell to his knees. ..."

- Kristina Peters Moone, The Green Man



"The force that through the green fuse drives the flower
Drives my green age; that blasts the roots of trees
Is my destroyer.
And I am dumb to tell the crooked rose
My youth is bent by the same wintry fever.

The force that drives the water through the rocks
Drives my red blood; that dries the mouthing streams
Turns mine to wax.
And I am dumb to mouth unto my veins
How at the mountain spring the same mouth sucks."

-   Dylan Thomas, The Force That Through the Green Fuse Drives the Flower




Lore, Legends, Tales, Celebrations, Springtime Symbols, Folk Stories and Plays
From the hypertext research notebooks of Mike Garofalo



This cabbage, these carrots, these potatoes,
these onions ... will soon become me.
Such a tasty fact!
- Mike Garofalo, Cuttings



Portrait of the Emperor Rudolph II as Autumn.By Arcimboldo, 1591, Held at the Museo Civico, Brescia.