Friday, July 22, 2016

Sacred Circles

I've put together a webpage on the subject of Sacred Circles.

This webpage provides links, bibliographic citations, resources, quotations, notes, and comments on medicine wheels, henges, labyrinths, neopagan sacred circles, holy circles, the symbolism and myths about circles and spheres, sacred circle gardens, the four elements, and related topics.

This webpage includes information and photographs of our sacred circle garden at our home in Red Bluff, California.

Those folks who walk the circle in labyrinthswalking meditation or baguazhang might find some of the information in sacred circles to be of interest to them.

Here are a few pictures from our sacred circle garden.  They were all taken a few years ago.  Everything is the same today, except all the trees and shrubs are larger.  









Thursday, July 21, 2016

Home Improvement Focus

Karen and I have been very busy with home improvement projects.  Little time or energy for other interesting research, studies, practices, and projects.

Friday, July 15, 2016

Two Campers Return

We returned to our home in Red Bluff yesterday afternoon.  Dry and hot (105F). 

We had been camping at Tugman State Park, 10 miles south of Reedsport, Oregon.  We explored the beautiful Umpqua River valley down to the boat docks at Winchester Bay.  Lovely cloudy skies and cool daytime temperatures (low 70'sF).  Eel lake was quite lovely.  

We hiked up the huge sand dunes along South Jetty Road, below Florence, Oregon, at the Siuslaw River terminus at the sea.  West of the dunes was the beach and breaking shore waves.  Lots of shells.  We were the only persons visiting the beach at that time.   

The sand dunes by the ocean in Oregeon are the largest ocean dunes in the USA.  They stretch for 60 miles from Florence to below Coos Bay, Oregon, along the Central Oregon Coast.  At some points the dunes are 20 miles wide.  





Image result for oregon sand dunes images

Image result for sand dunes oregon

Wednesday, July 06, 2016

Even the Little Finger Remembers

   “The body uses its skin and deeper fascia and flesh to record all that goes on around it.  Like the Rosetta stone, for those who know how to read it, the body is a living record of life given, life taken, life hoped for, life healed.  It is valued for its articulate ability to register immediate reaction, to feel profoundly, to sense ahead.
        
     The body is a multilingual being.  It speaks through its color and its temperature, the flush of recognition, the glow of love, the ash of pain, the heart of arousal, the coldness of nonconviction.  It speaks through its constant tiny dance, sometimes swaying, sometimes a-jitter, sometimes trembling.  It speaks through the leaping of the heart, the falling of the spirit, the pit at the center, and rising of hope.

     The body remembers, the bones remember, the joints remember, even the little finger remembers.  Memory is lodged in pictures and feelings in the cells themselves.  Like a sponge filled with water, anywhere the flesh is pressed, wrung, even touched slightly, a memory may flow out in a stream.

     To confine the beauty and the value of the body to anything less than this magnificence is to force the body to live without its rightful spirit, its rightful form, its right to exultation.  To be thought ugly or unacceptable because one’s beauty is outside the current fashion is deeply wounding to the natural joy that belongs to the wild nature.”
-      By Clarissa Pinkola Estés,  Women Who Run with the Wolves: Myths and Stories of the Wild Woman Archetype, 1996  


Body-Mind Practices, Somaesthetics

The Five Senses

Touch, Skin, Feeling, Hands, Tactile



Tuesday, July 05, 2016

Rejoice, and Men Will Seek You

"Laugh, and the world laughs with you;
Weep, and you weep alone.
For the sad old earth must borrow it's mirth,
But has trouble enough of its own.
Sing, and the hills will answer;
Sigh, it is lost on the air.
The echoes bound to a joyful sound,
But shrink from voicing care.

Rejoice, and men will seek you;
Grieve, and they turn and go.
They want full measure of all your pleasure,
But they do not need your woe.
Be glad, and your friends are many;
Be sad, and you lose them all.
There are none to decline your nectared wine,
But alone you must drink life's gall.

Feast, and your halls are crowded;
Fast, and the world goes by.
Succeed and give, and it helps you live,
But no man can help you die.
There is room in the halls of pleasure
For a long and lordly train,
But one by one we must all file on
Through the narrow aisles of pain."

-  Solitude by Ella Wheeler Wilcox, 1850-1919

How to Live the Good Life

Virtue Ethics

Hedonism and Epicureanism




Monday, July 04, 2016

Dao De Jing, Laozi, Chapter 24

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu
Chapter 24

"He who stands on tiptoe does not stand (firm);
He who strains his strides does not walk (well);
He who reveals himself is not luminous;
He who justifies himself is not far-famed;
He who boasts of himself is not given credit;
He who prides himself is not chief among men.
These in the eyes of Tao
Are called "the dregs and tumors of Virtue,"
Which are things of disgust.
Therefore the man of Tao spurns them."
-  Translated by Lin Yutang, 1955, Chapter 24




"By standing on tiptoe one cannot keep still.
Astride of one's fellow one cannot progress.
By displaying oneself one does not shine.
By self-approbation one is not esteemed.
In self-praise there is no merit.
He who exalts himself does not stand high.
Such things are to Tao what refuse and excreta are to the body.
They are everywhere detested.
Therefore the man of Tao will not abide with them."
-  Translated by Walter Gorn Old, 1904, Chapter 24


"It is not natural to stand on tiptoe, or being astride one does not walk.
One who displays himself is not bright, or one who asserts himself cannot shine.
A self-approving man has no merit, nor does one who praises himself grow.
The relation of these things (self-display, self-assertion, self-approval) to Tao is the same as offal is to food.
They are excrescences from the system; they are detestable; Tao does not dwell  in them."
-  Translated by Dwight Goddard, 1919, Chapter 24   





"Those who are on tiptoes cannot stand
Those who straddle cannot walk
Those who flaunt themselves are not clear
Those who presume themselves are not distinguished
Those who praise themselves have no merit
Those who boast about themselves do not last
Those with the Tao call such things leftover food or tumors
They despise them
Thus, those who possesses the Tao do not engage in them"
-  Translated by Derek Linn, 2006, Chapter 24  


企者不立.
跨者不行.
自見者不明.
自是者不彰.
自伐者無功.
自矜者不長.
其在道也, 曰餘食贅行.
物或惡之.
故有道者不處.
-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 24 



ch'i chê pu li.
k'ua chê pu hsing.
tzu chien chê pu ming.
tzu shih chê pu chang.
tzu fa chê wu kung.
tzu ching chê pu ch'ang.
ch'i tsai tao yeh, yüeh yü shih chui hsing.
wu huo wu chih.
ku yu tao chê pu ch'u.
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 24 




"Standing tiptoe a man loses balance,
Walking astride he has no pace,
Kindling himself he fails to light,
Acquitting himself he forfeits his hearers,
Admiring himself he does so alone.
Pride has never brought a man greatness
But, according to the way of life,
Brings the ills that make him unfit,
Make him unclean in the eyes of his neighbor,
And a sane man will have none of them."
-  Translated by Witter Bynner, 1944, Chapter 24  



"He who stands on tiptoe is not steady,
He who holds legs stiffly cannot walk.
He who looks at self does not see clearly.
He who asserts himself does not shine.
He who boasts of himself has no merit.
He who glorifies himself shall not endure.
These things are to the Tao like excreta or a hideous tumour to the body.
Therefore he who has Tao must give them no place."
-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 24  




"Quien se sostiene de puntillas no permanece mucho tiempo en pie.
Quien da largos pasos no puede ir muy lejos.
Quien quiere brillar
no alcanza la iluminación.
Quien pretende ser alguien
no lo será naturalmente.
Quien se ensalza no merece honores.
Quien se vanagloria
no realiza ninguna obra.
Para los seguidores del Tao, estos excesos son como excrecencias
y restos de basura que a todos repugnan.
Por eso, quien posee el Tao
no se detiene en ellos, sino que los rechaza."
-  Translation from Wikisource, 2013, Capitulo 24  


"Standing on tiptoe, you are unsteady.
Straddle-legged, you cannot go.
If you show yourself, you will not be seen.
If you affirm yourself, you will not shine.
If you boast, you will have no merit.
If you promote yourself, you will have no success.
Those who abide in the Tao call these
Leftover food and wasted action
And all things dislike them.
Therefore the person of the Tao does not act like this."
-  Translated by Charles Muller, 1891, Chapter 24



Is That a Fish in Your Ear?: Translation and the Meaning of Everything  By David Bellos.  New York, Faber and Faber, 2011.  Index, notes, 393 pages.  ISBN: 9780865478763. VSCL.  



A typical webpage created by Mike Garofalo for each one of the 81 Chapters (Verses, Sections) of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) includes over 25 different English language translations or interpolations for that Chapter, 5 Spanish language translations for that Chapter, the Chinese characters for that Chapter, the Wade-Giles and Hanyu Pinyin transliterations (Romanization) of the Mandarin Chinese words for that Chapter, and 2 German and 1 French translation of that Chapter.  Each webpage for each one of the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching includes extensive indexing by key words, phrases, and terms for that Chapter in English, Spanish, and the Wade-Giles Romanization.  Each webpage on a Chapter of the Daodejing includes recommended reading in books and websites, a detailed bibliography, some commentary, research leads, translation sources, a Google Translate drop down menu, and other resources for that Chapter.   

Chapter 24, Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu


Chapter and Thematic Index (Concordance) to the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

English Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index

Spanish Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices


Taoism: A Selected Reading List







Sunday, July 03, 2016

Drag Me Down Damn Hot

For the past 10 days, we have had daytime temperatures from 105F to 112F. 

Other than 6 hours in the morning (5:30 am - 10:30 am), it is just too damn hot for me in the afternoon.  I get all my gardening chores, watering chores, and outdoor chores done in the early morning.  

As I get older, the extreme heat is much harder for me to tolerate.  

It has sapped my energy and interest in just about all activities.  

I did enjoy, yesterday afternoon, sitting in front of a fan and watching a DVD recording of the opening day of the Tour de France, and sipping iced tea.  



Saturday, July 02, 2016

You Are One of the Few

If the world's population was only 100 people, how would the current demographics and economics translate from 7 billion to 100 people.  

A Power Point Presentation on World Demographics and Economics

Click on link, then on subsequent pictures in the presentation.


Sobering facts!  

Friday, July 01, 2016

Retired Now ... Yes

I retired from my position as Technology and Media Services Manager for the Corning Union Elementary School District on July 1, 2016.  I had worked for this school district for the last 16 years.  I retired as a Library Administrator from the County of Los Angeles Public Library in 1998.  I have always enjoyed working, and may do so part-time in the future.  

I resigned from my position as a fitness instructor (yoga, taijiquan, pilates, spin, personal fitness trainer) at the Tehama Family Fitness Center in Red Bluff, on July 1, 2016.  I will no longer be teaching at the TFFC.  

I will no longer be teaching taijiquan privately at my home, because we will be traveling quite a bit and moving.  

Karen and I are now selling our home in Red Bluff, and moving to Vancouver, Washington.  Both of our children and their families live in Vancouver.  We also desire a change in location from the rural North Sacramento Valley to a more metropolitan environment in Southwest Washington.  

We are now busy prepping our house, moving items to Washington, and looking for a home to rent or buy in the Vancouver/Portland metro area.  

My websites and blog will continue, albeit at a reduced level, until we get settled in Vancouver.  

I will resume teaching Taijiquan and Yoga in the Vancouver and/or Portland area in the future.  Also, I will be looking for a good Taijiquan School in that area.  Suggestions??

I retired at the age of 70.  


Monday, June 27, 2016

Visiting with Family

My daughter and her two daughters came to visit Karen and I on Saturday afternoon, 6/25.  We've been mostly hanging around our home and property and playing.  Nice summer days for family fun.  

Today, everyone is going up to the Shasta Caverns Tour above Shasta Dam. Lake Shasta looks nicer with the water levels up high.  I will stay at home, trying to mend my knees, watering, taking it easy, daydreaming.  

Wednesday we plan to visit Whiskeytown Lake.  

The Flinn's will leave Red Bluff for Vancouver, Washington, on this coming Saturday morning, 7/2.  

Busy with playing with grand-children, daughter, and their new Lab dog.  

Little time for reading and writing.  


Friday, June 24, 2016

Walking Amidst Beautiful Things

"Today I have grown taller from walking with the trees."
-  Karle Wilson


"I like to walk about amidst the beautiful things that adorn the world."
-  George Santayana


"I was never less alone than when by myself."
-  Edward Gibbon


"The walking stick serves the purpose of an advertisement that the bearer's hands are employed otherwise that in useful effort, and it therefore has utility as an evidence of leisure."
-  Thorstein Veblen, Theory of the Leisure Class




"... the brisk exercise imparts elasticity to the muscles, fresh and healthy blood circulates through the brain, the mind works well, the eye is clear, the step is firm, and the day's exertion always make the evening's repose thoroughly enjoyable."
-  Dr. David Livingstone



Currently, I am reading the following two books:

The Birth of Hedonism: The Cyrenaic Philosophers and Pleasure as a Way of Life. By Kurt Lampe. Princeton University Press, 2014. 304 pages. ISBN: 978-0691161136. VSCL.


Happiness: A History By Darrin M. McMahon. New York, Atlantic Monthly Press, Grove Press, 2006. Index, notes, 544 pages. ISBN: 97808022142894. VSCL.
Walking - Quotations, Sayings, Poems, Lore

Solitude - Quotations  

Traveling, Camping and Hiking in Oregon

Pleasure, Satisfaction, Desire - Quotations



I walk four miles along a quiet paved country lane.  The photograph below, taken by Karen, was on a early Spring day.  In the summer, I walk at first daylight - the Dawn Walk.  

Today, there was a half-moon in the morning sky.      




We are selling our home and property in Red Bluff, California.  A 1909 square foot house, 4 bedrooms, 2 baths: 5 acres of land, 2 wells, 2 ponds, extensive gardens and orchard.  Photographs.



Thursday, June 23, 2016

Kenneth Rexroth's Comments on the Tao Te Ching

"In the Confucian writings Tao usually means either a road or a way of life. It means that in the opening verse of the Tao Te Ching, “The way that can be followed (or the road that can be traced or charted) is not the true way. The word that can be spoken is not the true word.” Very quickly the text drives home the numinous significance of both Tao and TeTao is described by paradox and contradiction — the Absolute in a worldview where absolutes are impossible, the ultimate reality which is neither being nor not being, the hidden meaning behind all meaning, the pure act which acts without action and yet the reason and order of the simplest physical occurrence.

It is quite possible — in fact Joseph Needham in his great Science and Civilization in China does so — to interpret the Tao Te Ching as a treatise of elementary primitive scientific empiricism; certainly it is that. Over and over it says, “learn the way of nature”; “do not try to overcome the forces of nature but use them.” On the other hand, Fr. Leo Weiger, S.J., called the Tao Te Ching a restatement of the philosophy of the Upanishads in Chinese terms. Buddhists, especially Zen Buddhists in Japan and America, have understood and translated the book as a pure statement of Zen doctrine. Even more remarkable, contemporary Chinese, and not all of them Marxists, have interpreted it as an attack on private property and feudal oppression, and as propaganda for communist anarchism. Others have interpreted it as a cryptic work of erotic mysticism and yoga exercises. It is all of these things and more, and not just because of the ambiguity of the ideograms in a highly compressed classical Chinese text; it really is many things to many men — like the Tao itself.

Perhaps the best way to get at the foundations of the philosophy of the Tao Te Ching is by means of a historical, anthropological approach which in itself may be mythical. There is little doubt that the organized Taoist religion, which came long after the Tao Te Ching but which still was based on it, swept up into an occultist system much of the folk religion of the Chinese culture area, much as Japanese Shinto (which means the Tao of the Gods) did in Japan. If the later complicated Taoist religion developed from the local cults, ceremonies and superstitions of the precivilized folk religion, how could it also develop from the Tao Te Ching or from the early Taoist philosophers whose works are collected under the names of Chuang Tzu and Lieh Tzu and who are about as unsuperstitious and antiritualistic as any thinkers in history? The connection is to be found I feel in the shamans and shamanesses of a pan-Asiatic culture which stretches from the Baltic far into America, and to the forest philosophers and hermits who appear at the beginnings of history and literature in both India and China and whose prehistoric existence is testified by the yogi in the lotus position on a Mohenjo-Daro seal. The Tao Te Ching describes the experiential or existential core of the transcendental experience shared by the visionaries of primitive cultures. The informants of Paul Radin’s classic Primitive Man as Philosopher say much the same things. It is this which gives it its air of immemorial wisdom, although many passages are demonstrably later than Confucius, and may be later than the “later” Taoists, Chuang Tzu and Lieh Tzu.

There are two kinds of esotericism in Oriental religion: the proliferation of spells, chants, rituals, mystical diagrams, cosmologies and cosmogonies, trials of the soul, number mysticism, astrology, and alchemy, all of which go to form the corpus of a kind of pan-Gnosticism. Its remarkable similarities are shared by early Christian heretics, Jewish Kabbalists, Tantric worshipers of Shiva, Japanese Shingon Buddhists, and Tibetan lamas. The other occultism (held strangely enough by the most highly developed minds amongst some people) is the exact opposite, a stark religious empiricism shorn of all dogma or cult, an attitude toward life based upon realization of the unqualified religious experience as such. What does the contemplator contemplate? What does the life of illumination illuminate? To these questions there can be no answer — the experience is beyond qualification. So say the Zen documents, a form of late Buddhism originating in China, but so say the Hinayana texts, which are assumed to be as near as we can get to the utterances of the historic Buddha Sakyamuni, but so say also the Upanishads — “not this, not this, not that, not that,” but so also say some of the highly literate and sophisticated technical philosophers (in our sense of the word) of Sung Dynasty Neo-Confucianism. So says the Tao Te Ching.
In terms of Western epistemology, a subject Classical Chinese thought does not even grant existence, the beginning and end of knowledge are the same thing —  the intuitive apprehension of reality as a totality, before and behind the data of sense or the constructions of experience and reason. The Tao Te Ching insists over and over that this is both a personal, psychological and a social, moral, even political first principle. At the core of life is a tiny, steady flame of contemplation. If this goes out the person perishes, although the body and its brain may stumble on, and civilization goes rapidly to ruin. The source of life, the source of the order of nature, the source of knowledge, and the source of social order are all identical — the immediate comprehension of the reality beyond being and not being; existence and essence; being and becoming. Contact with this reality is the only kind of power there is. Against that effortless power all self-willed acts and violent attempts to rule self, man, or natural process are delusion and end only in disaster.

The lesson is simple, and once learned, easy to paraphrase. The Tao is like water. Striving is like smoke. The forces of Nature are infinitely more powerful than the strength of men. Toil to the top of the highest peak and you will be swept away in the first storm. Seek the lowest possible point and eventually the whole mountain will descend to you. There are two ways of knowing, under standing and over bearing. The first is called wisdom. The second is called winning arguments. Being, as power, comes from the still void behind being and  not being. The enduring and effective power of the individual, whether hermit or  king or householder, comes from the still void at the heart of the contemplative. The wise statesman conquers by the quiet use of his opponents’ violence, like the judo and jujitsu experts.

The Tao Te Ching is a most remarkable document, but the most remarkable thing about it is that it has not long since converted all men to its self-evident philosophy. It was called mysterious at the beginning of this essay. It is really simple and obvious; what is mysterious is the complex ignorance and complicated morality of mankind that reject its wisdom.
-  Kenneth RexrothClassics Revisited, 1968


A typical webpage created by Mike Garofalo for each one of the 81 Chapters (Verses, Sections) of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) includes over 25 different English language translations or interpolations for that Chapter, 5 Spanish language translations for that Chapter, the Chinese characters for that Chapter, the Wade-Giles and Hanyu Pinyin transliterations (Romanization) of the Mandarin Chinese words for that Chapter, and 2 German and 1 French translation of that Chapter.  Each webpage for each one of the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching includes extensive indexing by key words, phrases, and terms for that Chapter in English, Spanish, and the Wade-Giles Romanization.  Each webpage on a Chapter of the Daodejing includes recommended reading in books and websites, a detailed bibliography, some commentary, research leads, translation sources, a Google Translate drop down menu, and other resources for that Chapter.   

Chapter 81, Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu


Chapter and Thematic Index (Concordance) to the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

English Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index

Spanish Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices


Taoism: A Selected Reading List


Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Starting My Retirement

Yesterday, I decided not to return to my part-time position with the Corning Union Elementary School District.  I will not be working during the 2016-2107 school year.  I have resigned and retired, effective June 30th, 2016.  I worked for this K-8 school district, with 2,200 students, for 16 years as the District Librarian or Technology and Media Services Supervisor.  

Overall, I am in fairly good health except for my injured right hip, right knee, and left knee.  While running on 3/13, I fell on my right side and injured my right hip and right knee.  While descending a stairway on 6/18, I stumbled and fell down and injured my left knee.  Hopefully, with treatment, I will regain my former fitness and resume athletic activities.  

I retired when I was 70 years of age.  I have been gainfully employed since the age of 15 in libraries (city, county, school), teaching, management, and information services.  

My wife, Karen, retired in 2014.  We are moving to Vancouver, Washington.  



We are selling our home and property in Red Bluff, California.  A 1909 square foot house, 4 bedrooms, and 2 baths.  5 acres of land, 2 wells, 2 ponds, extensive gardens and orchard.  Photographs.












Monday, June 20, 2016

Taijiquan Classes in Red Bluff

Note:  On July 1, 2016, I will stop teaching Taijiquan and Yoga/Qigong in Red Bluff.
I retired on 7/1/2016.  I will resume teaching in Vancouver and/or Portland area in the near future.
We are selling our home in Red Bluff, and moving to Vancouver, Washington.



Morning Outdoor Taijiquan Classes
Yang Style Taijiquan 24, 108, and 37 Forms, Cane, Push Hands, Qigong
Saturday, 7:30 am - 8:45 am
Saturday, 9:00 am - 10:15 am
Fees:  $10-$25, Barter, Sliding Scale Options, Negotiated
Location: At the Valley Spirit Center, Red Bluff, CA


Evening Indoor Taijiquan Classes
Yang Style Taijiquan 24, 108, and 37 Forms, Cane, Push Hands, Qigong 
Tuesday 6:35 pm - 7:35 pm
Thursday  6:35 pm - 7:35 pm
Location: At the Tehama Family Fitness Center in Red Bluff
$5.00 per class, Free to TFFC Members


Evening Indoor Hatha Yoga and Qigong Classes

Monday 5:30 - 6:30 pm
Tuesday 5:30 - 6:30 pm
Thursday 5:30 - 6:30 pm
Location: At the Tehama Family Fitness Center in Red Bluff
$5.00 per class, Free to TFFC Members



No Taijiquan Class on 6/21 or 6/23, due to my left knee injury.  


Instructor:  Mike Garofalo, M.S.  










Sunday, June 19, 2016

Home Base Restablished

Today, Karen, Katelyn, and I, drove south from Vancouver, Washington, 485 miles of driving, to Red Bluff, California.  We all arrived in good humor, safe and sound.  Steady, fast, and safe Interstate 5 travel.  

I am now at my main desktop workstation.  Surprisingly, it is relatively cool indoors with two small fans running in the house.  

From, June 8th to June 18th, we stayed at our family home in Vancouver, Washington.  

It was satisfying and a pleasure to see everyone- chat, sight see, dine, and shop with family and friends.    

I really enjoyed sitting on a balcony with views over trees of the complex cloud movements flowing overhead every day.  Cool weather!  Clean air.  Some rain! Sipping hot beverages and looking.  Lovely weather the entire vacation in Vancouver/Portland.  

Karen and I visited many cities in southwestern Washington.  We traveled on Washington State Road 4 and State Road 6.  The entire north side of the Cloumbia River Valley from Vancouver to Illaco is spectacular; and Wilapa Bay will be revisited by me in the near future.  

We helped our son and his wife move out of their rented home in Portland.  Their lease was up on June 15th, and the owner wants to sell.  

A delightful vacation for Karen and I.  

Unfortunately, for me, 0n 6/18, I fell down the last two steps of a stairway and fell hard on my left knee.  I will see my internal medicine physician on Monday morning 7/20, for my 4 month blood test results; however, my major concern now is getting Lassen Medical Center to promptly help me to begin healing my injured left knee.  I can walk.  But I sense that that the injury is more serious. This is a bad turn of events for my body.  A bad fall on 3/13 injuring my right knee and right hip; and, now, a second fall on 6/18 injuring my left knee.  I just can't believe this.  Double Darn Bad Shit ... I hope not.  We shall see.