Thursday, April 11, 2019

Waving Hands Like Clouds

Cloud Hands is a common movement sequence in Tai Chi Chuan.
It is called "Yun Shou."

Your arms move in soft flowing motions from side to side across the body.  One hand is higher than the other.  The feet move gracefully and deliberately, mostly to the left.  The patterns repeat three or four times.

Some of these same movements are executed in more forceful and much faster kung fu styles as back fists, blocks, elbow strikes, slaps, diversions, grabs, joint locks, bagua spins, etc.

Just as there are slow quiet songs, there are fast loud songs.  Both are music.

Whole books, articles, and videotaped lectures and demonstrations about Moving Hands Like Clouds or Cloud Hands are available for further study on the subject.

Delightfully, Cloud Hands can be practiced while you are seated.  It gently stretches the waist, shoulders, back, and neck.  It is simple and fun to play in this way.

Cloud Hands is practiced in Taijiquan with ease, softness, grace, fluidity, balance, and quietness.  Being gentle is praised.  We try to settle into being relaxed (Sung).

Tai Chi Chuan - Cloud Hands   Website by Michael P. Garofalo


Wednesday, April 10, 2019

I Tripped at the Hole



"Astronomers reached across intergalactic space to a giant galaxy known as Messier 87, in the constellation Virgo. There, a black hole about seven billion times more massive than the sun is unleashing a violent jet of energy some 5,000 light years into space."
- New York Times, April 10, 2019




Oil drillers dig holes into the earth that release gas and oil energies.  Not the same as the astronomer's "Black Holes"; but names vary as realities and our living interactions and language games vary or are sustained with others.    

Today, I will dig a hole into our back yard black soil, along our vertical trellis, and then plant a third evergreen clematis vine.  The plant will flourish in that black hole.

Last week a dermatological surgeon incised a squamous tumor from in my left hand, and covered the wound with 10 stitches.  Healed well, and I can return to lifting more than 10 pounds today.  It was a red hole in my flesh for a brief time.  

I've looked down into that multicolored hole called the Grand Canyon and the green Columbia Gorge, big holes in the earth, all with powerful energy producing Rivers flowing Down, down, down ...

The dead human beings are often buried in black holes.  

The Universe expands and contracts in ways to tax and challenge our and my scientific imagination and understanding.  

Yin and Yang, Emptinesses and Energies.  

 

Sunday, March 31, 2019

Chapter 33, Tao Te Ching, Lao Tzu

Dao De Jing, Lao Tzu
Chapter 33


"One who knows others is clever, but one who knows himself is enlightened.
One who conquers others is powerful, but one who conquers himself is mighty.
One who knows contentment is rich and one who pushes with vigor has will.
One who loses not his place endures.
One who may die but will not perish, has life everlasting."
-  Translated by Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki and Paul Carus, 1913, Chapter 33 



"It is wisdom to know others;
It is enlightenment to know one's self.
The conqueror of men is powerful;
The master of himself is strong.
It is wealth to be content;
It is willful to force one's way on others.
Endurance is to keep one's place;
Long life it is to die and not perish."
-  Translated by R. B. Blakney, 1955, Chapter 33   



"He who knows others is wise;
He who knows himself is enlightened.
He who conquers others is strong;
He who conquers himself is mighty.
He who knows contentment is rich.
He who keeps on his course with energy has will.
He who does not deviate from his proper place will long endure.
He who may die but not perish has longevity."
-  Translated by Ch'u Ta-Kao, 1904, Chapter 33 





"Know others by knowing yourself.
Overcome others by overcoming yourself.
Understanding what is enough is enough.
Presence is perseverance.
Coming to stillness is forging ahead.
Find life by accepting death."
-  Translated by Starwell Crispin, Chapter 33 


知人者智.
自知者明.
勝人者有力.
自勝者強.
知足者富.
強行者有志.
不失其所者久.
死而不亡者壽.  

-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 33 


zhi ren zhe zhi.
zi zhi zhe ming.
sheng ren zhe you li.
zi sheng zhe qiang.
zhi zu zhe fu.
qiang xing zhe you zhi.
bu shi qi suo zhe jiu.
si er bu wang zhe shou.
- Pinyin Romanization, Daodejing, Chapter 33



"He who knows others is intelligent;
he who understands himself is enlightened;
he who is able to conquer others has force,
but he who is able to control himself is mighty.
He who appreciates contentment is wealthy.
He who dares to act has nerve;
if he can maintain his position he will endure,
but he, who dying does not perish, is immortal."
-  Translated by Dwight Goddard, 1919, Chapter 33  




"Knowledge frequently results
from knowing others,
but the man who is awakened,
has seen the uncarved block.
Others might be mastered by force,
but to master one's self
requires the Tao.
He who has many material things,
may be described as rich,
but he who knows he has enough,
and is at one with the Tao,
might have enough of material things,
and have self-being as well.
Will-power may bring perseverance;
but to have tranquility is to endure,
being protected for all his days.
He whose ideas remain in the world,
is present for all time."
-  Translated by Stan Rosenthal, 1984, Chapter 33  




"Quien conoce a los demás es inteligente.
Quien se conoce a sí mismo tiene visión interna.
Quien conquista a los demás tiene fuerza; quien se conquista a sí mismo es realmente poderoso.
Quien sabe cuándo ha obtenido bastante es rico, y quien sigue asiduamente
     el sendero del Tao es alguien de propósito constante.
Quien permanece en el lugar en el que ha encontrado su verdadera casa vive mucho tiempo,
     y quien muere, pero no perece, goza de la auténtica longevidad."
-  Translation from Chinese to English by John C. H. Wu, translated into Spanish by Alfonso Colodrón, Capitulo 33 




"Knowing others makes you smart, but knowing yourself makes you wise.
To rule others, you must be powerful, but to rule yourself, you must be strong.
If you have only what you need, you have true wealth.
If you never give up, you will find a way.
If you stay true to yourself, you will never be lost.
If you live your entire life, you’ve really lived."
-  Translated by Ron Hogan, 1995, Chapter 33



A typical webpage created by Mike Garofalo for each one of the 81 Chapters (Verses, Sections) of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) includes 25 different English language translations or interpolations for that Chapter, 5 Spanish language translations for that Chapter, the Chinese characters for that Chapter, the Wade-Giles and Hanyu Pinyin transliterations (Romanization) of the Mandarin Chinese words for that Chapter, and 2 German and 1 French translation of that Chapter.  Each webpage for each one of the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching includes extensive indexing by key words, phrases, and terms for that Chapter in English, Spanish, and the Wade-Giles Romanization.  Each webpage on a Chapter of the Daodejing includes recommended reading in books and websites, a detailed bibliography, some commentary, research leads, translation sources, a Google Translate drop down menu, and other resources for that Chapter.  These are hypertext documents, and available online under Creative Commons 4.

Chapter 33, Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu. Complied by Mike Garofalo.

Chapter and Thematic Index (Concordance) to the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu


Concordance, Alphabetical Subject Index, Chapters 1-25

English Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index

Spanish Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: A Selected Reading List

A Solitary Daoist Neopagan's Final Journey

An Old Philosopher's Notebooks

How to Live a Good Life: Advice from Wise Persons







Friday, March 22, 2019

First Day of Spring


"Last day of Winter,
leafless walnut trees─
form is emptiness.
First day of Spring,
clear sky to Mt. Shasta─
emptiness is form."
 
-  Michael P. Garofalo
   Cuttings: March




Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Retail Gardens Thriving

We shop at retail gardens in the northeast area of Vancouver, Washington.

Today, I visited Lowe's on 117th Ave and 78th St.  Their gardening area was well stocked with many kinds of plants, shrubs, starters, colors, seeds, sizes, soils, bricks, wood, and equipment.  Today, I purchased a hanging basket with colorful flowers, a heather plant in bloom, and six bricks.  Karen and I will return tomorrow.

A few days ago we visited Yard and Garden on NE Hwy 99.  I plan to visit my nearby Home Depot on Andresson and 78th St.  Even our local Fred Meyer Supermarket, across from Lowes, has a well stocked gardening area.

This Springtime Gardening Extravagance of plants and gardening supplies is inspiring to me.  The colors are enlivening.  Exhuberance of Green Beings-- all in Monrovia Nursery containers.

We have also shopped at many nurseries in Portland and up in Woodland (Tsusagawa) and up elsewhere in Washington.




Sunday, March 17, 2019

Happy Birthday Karen Garofalo

Best wishes for good health, well being, and happiness in your 7th Decade of Life.  I love you!

Also, a joyful St. Patrick's Day.

A family dinner tonight: corn beef sandwiches, potato salad, cole slaw, and Irish Whiskey.

Yesterday, Saturday, we all went to McMenamins restaurant in Kalama, Washington.  The new restaurant and hotel are adjacent to the Columbia River in Kalama along the levy.  Here is a photo of the three generations of ladies in our family




Saturday, March 16, 2019

Back Ache Problems

For the last two months I have been trying to recover from re-injuring the middle of my upper back and neck, primarily on the right side under the shoulder blade.  All the usual remedies such as resting, massage, heat packs, cold packs, analgesic cream, gentle stretching, and extra sleep have been tried.

I injured his area while in my 30's while weightlifting.  I have had this area re-injuring numerous times in the decades since. 

This recent flare up has been a discouraging and painful at times.  Hopefully, I might someday heal this injury.  I am sure the injury is now, at age 73, compounded by arthritis problems.

Hoping for the best!

Friday, March 15, 2019

Dao De Jing, Laozi, Chapter 32

Tao Te Ching, by Lao Tzu

Chapter 32


"The Way is eternally nameless,
Though simplicity is small, the world cannot subordinate it.
If lords and monarchs can keep to it, all beings will naturally resort to them.
Heaven and earth combine, thus showering sweet dew.
No humans command it; it is even by nature.
The Way is to the world as rivers and oceans to valley streams."
-  Translated by Thomas Cleary, 1991, Chapter 32



"The Tao of the Absolute has no name.
Although infinitesimal in its Simplicity,
The world cannot master it.
If leaders would hold on to it,
All Things would naturally follow.
Heaven and Earth would unite to rain Sweet Dew,
And people would naturally cooperate without commands.
Names emerge when institutions begin.
When names emerge, know likewise to stop.
To know when to stop is to be free of danger.
The presence of the Tao in the world
Is like the valley stream joining the rivers and seas."

-  Translated by R. L. Wing, 1986, Chapter 32


"The Way eternal has no name.
A block of wood untooled, though small,
May still excel in the world.
And if the king and nobles could
Retain its potency for good,
Then everything would freely give
Allegiance to their rule.
The earth and sky would then conspire
To bring the sweet dew down;
And evenly it would be given
To folk without constraining power.
Creatures came to be with order's birth,
And once they had appeared,
Came also knowledge of repose,
And with that was security.
In this world,
Compare those of the Way
To torrents that flow
Into river and sea."
-   Translated by Raymond B. Blakney, 1955, Chapter 32   



"The Tao remains eternally unnamable.
As undivided simplicity,
If it resides in an ordinary person,
nobody in the world can subjugate him;
If an influential person abides by it,
everybody in the world will be drawn to him.
When heaven and earth come together in harmony,
Showering the world equally with the sweet rain of undivided simplicity,
People cooperate voluntarily without any governing rules.
When simplicity is divided, names come into existence.
When names are already there, the process of further division should stop,
For to know when to stop
is to avoid the danger of complexity.
The Tao is to the world
what the ocean is to the rivers of the earth."
-  Translated by Yasuhiko Genku Kimura, Chapter 32   



"Tao, the Eternally Nameless.
Though primordial simplicity is infinitesimal, none dare make it a public servant.
Were princes and monarchs able to maintain it, all creation would spontaneously submit.
Heaven and earth harmonized, there would be an abundance of nourishing agencies; the people unbidden, would cooperate of their own accord.
Names arose when differentiation commenced; once there were names it became important to know where to stop.
This being known, danger ceased.
The Tao spread throughout the world, may be compared to mountain rivulets and streams flowing toward the sea."
-  Translated by C. Spurgeon Medhurst, 1905, Chapter 32 



道常無名.
樸雖小, 天下莫能臣也.
侯王若能守之, 萬物將自賓.
天地相合, 以降甘露, 民莫之令而自均.
始制有名.
名亦既有.
夫亦將知止.
知止所以不殆.
譬道之在天下.
猶川谷之與江海.
-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 32



tao ch'ang wu ming.
p'u sui hsiao, t'ien hsia mo nêng ch'ên yeh.
hou wang jo nêng shou chih, wan wu chiang tzu pin.
t'ien ti hsiang ho, yi chiang kan lu, min mo chih ling erh tzu chün.
shih chih yu ming.
ming yi chi yu.
fu yi chiang chih chih.
chih chih so k'o pu tai.
p'i tao chih tsai t'ien hsia.
yu ch'uan ku chih yü chiang hai.

-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 32 



"The eternal Tao is nameless; though it be
Too insignificant a name to have,
In its primordial simplicity
The whole world dare not make of it a slave.
If prince or king could keep it, everything
Would homage pay to him spontaneously,
And Heaven and Earth, combined, sweet dews would bring,
And people know no rule but harmony.
But when it takes control, it has a name,
And, knowing when to stop, men rest at ease,
For to the Tao the whole world is the same
s river streams compared with mighty seas."
-  Translated by Isaac Winter Heysinger, 1903, Chapter 32

"Tao is forever of no name.
Small as it may be,
Tao as the uncarved block cannot be used by anyone in the universe.
If kings and lords could follow it well,
Ten Thousand Things will spontaneously obey them.
Heaven and earth would make love to each other,
Sweet dew will thereby fall gently.
With no decrees, people will be naturally ruled.
When the whole uncarved block is divided,
The pieces become instruments and in need of their names.
When there are already many names,
It is also necessary to know their limitations.
When their limitations are known,
There are no things in danger.
Tao is manifest in the universe,
Like the water flows from the rivers and the valleys into Yan Ze River and ocean."
-  Translated by Eichi Shimomisse, 1998, Chapter 32  

   

"El Tao es eterno.
El Tao no tiene nombre.
Pequeño es en su perfecta simplicidad primera.
Pequeño como es, el mundo entero es incapaz de aprehenderlo.
Si sólo príncipes y reyes pudieran aprehenderlo tendrían el mundo en la palma de la mano.
La tierra y el cielo estando unidos harían caer la lluvia como un suave rocío.
La paz y el orden reinarían espontáneamente entre los hombres sin necesidad de estar sometidos a un mando.
Cuando la perfecta simplicidad primero se diversificó, aparecieron los nombres.
Apareciendo los nombres, el Tao no se quedó en ellos.
El saber detenerse es estar sin peligros.
Compara El Tao con la existencia universal.
El Tao es como un riachuelo y un valle frente al gran río y al mar."
-  Translation from Logia Medio Dia, 2015, Capítulo 32 



"Tao has always been nameless;
an Uncarved Block, simple and small, but subject to none under Heaven.
All things will obey the Monarch who defends it.
Heaven uniting with Earth, as sweet dew falling.
People not commanded, but true to themselves.
First there were names, then more names.
It is time to stop.
Knowing when to stop avoids exhaustion.
Tao flows from Heaven, as Rivers flow into the Sea."
-  Translated by Karl Kromal, 2002, Chapter 32  



"The Tao is nameless and unchanging. 
Although it appears insignificant,
nothing in the world can contain it.
If a ruler abides by its principles,
then her people will willingly follow.
Heaven would then reign on earth,
like sweet rain falling on paradise.
People would have no need for laws,
because the law would be written on their hearts.
Naming is a necessity for order,
but naming can not order all things.
Naming often makes things impersonal,
so we should know when naming should end.
Knowing when to stop naming,
you can avoid the pitfall it brings.
All things end in the Tao
just as the small streams and the largest rivers
flow through valleys to the sea."
-  Translated by John H. McDonald, 1996, Chapter 32 




A typical webpage created by Mike Garofalo for each one of the 81 Chapters (Verses, Sections) of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) includes 25 different English language translations or interpolations for that Chapter, 5 Spanish language translations for that Chapter, the Chinese characters for that Chapter, the Wade-Giles and Hanyu Pinyin transliterations (Romanization) of the Mandarin Chinese words for that Chapter, and 2 German and 1 French translation of that Chapter.  Each webpage for each one of the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching includes extensive indexing by key words, phrases, and terms for that Chapter in English, Spanish, and the Wade-Giles Romanization.  Each webpage on a Chapter of the Daodejing includes recommended reading in books and websites, a detailed bibliography, some commentary, research leads, translation sources, a Google Translate drop down menu, and other resources for that Chapter.  These are hypertext documents, and available online under Creative Commons 4.

Chapter 32, Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu. Complied by Mike Garofalo.

Chapter and Thematic Index (Concordance) to the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu


Concordance, Alphabetical Subject Index, Chapters 1-25.

English Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index

Spanish Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: A Selected Reading List

A Solitary Daoist Neopagan's Final Journey

An Old Philosopher's Notebooks

How to Live a Good Life: Advice from Wise Persons






    

Thursday, March 14, 2019

Mossy Grave


"The smell of the sea hugged the fog in the redwood trees,
All cool and dank, dimly lit and rank with green,
And in shadowed limbs the Stellar jays jabbered free,
And me, standing silently, an alien in this enchanted scene.

From behind the mossy grey stumps
the sounds of footsteps crunching fronds of ferns
caught my suddenly wary mind ...
What?

"Hello, old friend," said Chang San Feng.
"Master Chang, what a surprise," said I.
Master Chang sat on a stump, smiled, and said,

"Can you hear the Blue Dragon singing in the decaying tree;
Or is it the White Tiger roaring in the wilderness of your bright white skull?
No matter! The answer is in the questioning; don't you Chan men see?

In the red ball flesh of this decaying tree
Sapless woody shards of centuries of seasons
Nourish the new roots of mindfulness sprouting.
Yes, Yes, but how can it be?
The up-surging waves of life sprout forth from the decaying tree,
As sure as sunrise rolling over the deep black sea.
Coming, coming, endlessly coming; waves of Chi.

Tan Qian's raven roosts for 10,000 moons
in the withered branches of the rotting tree;
then, one day, the weathered tree falls,
nobody hearing, soundlessly crashing
on the forest floor, on some unknown noon.

Over and over, over and over, life bringing death, death bringing life,
Beyond even the miraculous memories of an old Xian like me;
Watching, watching, sequestered from the strife,
Turning my soul away sometimes because I cannot bear to see.

Even minds may die, but Mind is always free
Bounding beyond, beyond, far beyond you and me;
Somehow finding the Possibility Keys
And unlocking the Door out of the Voids of Eternities."

Master Chang somehow, someway,
slowly disappeared into the red brown heart of the decaying tree.

Then the squawk of the jay
opened my mind's eye to the new day -
Namaste."

- Michael P. Garofalo
  Meetings with Master Chang San Feng
  Remembering Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park, California






Monday, March 11, 2019

Spring Energies

"The Green Fire
Aengus is a deathless comrade of the Spring, and we may well pray to him to let his green fire move in our veins."-  Fiona MacLeod, "The Birds of Aengus Og"

Aengus Ma Og is the Irish deity whose spirit inhabits the megalithic monument of Newgrange in the Boyne Valley of Ireland.  His hostel on the banks of the Boyne is a traditional entrance to the otherworld, a place where souls congregate and rest.  In their soul's circuit, several Irish heroes and heroines have become lost or disorientated.  It is within Aengus's care that they are given time to recover.  

Birds and other animals begin to choose their mates as the growing year burgeons strongly in the strengthening sunlight.  The green fire that runs all over the earth is sparked by this very sunlight and the deep germinating power of the earth.  When plants reach toward the sunlight, the red, violet, and blue bands of the light spectrum activate the chlorophyll pigment within each leaf so that it reflects green.  This pigment alters as the year progresses, causing the leaves to change color, but from this time forward  the medley of greens is apparent.  

This green fire is also within us - not in our physical bodies, as it is in plants, but in our emotional and creative lives.  Spring fever has many manifestations, some almost hormonal.  The creative urge of spring brings into being much verse, for example, as our emotional upheavals reach out for fresh life and vigor.  To experience the green fire and answer to its call is to commune with the green vigor of Aengus.  

Where is the green fire in your own life at this time?  Take your emotional and creative temperature; then give yourself over to something pleasurable and enlivening this week."  

-  Caitlin Matthews, The Celtic Spirit: Daily Meditations for the Turning Year, 1999, p. 159; Meditation for March 29th.  

March Holidays and Religious Celebrations

March Poetry and Lore  




Friday, March 08, 2019

Tao Te Ching, Lao Tzu, Chapter 31

Dao De Jing, by Laozi

Chapter 31



"Now, weapons are instruments of ill omen;  Divinity abhors them.
Therefore, one who abides in Dao does not abide weapons.
The Superior Person, at home, honors the more powerful Left-side;
on the battlefield, the more gentle Right-side;
they put Peace above all else,
and refuse to glorify weapons.
If one glorifies weapons, this propagates killing.
One who delights in killing people has no influence with Heaven.
On occasions of celebration, one honors the Left-side;
on occasions of grief, the Right-side is honored more.
A Deputy General stands on the Left side;
their Commander stands at the Right..
in other words, they stand in the order of their gravity of offense.
The killing of masses of people we ought bewail with sorrow and grief.
Victory in battle we ought commemorate with mournful rites."
-  Translated by Jerry C. Welch, 1998, Chapter 31 


"The Master who is a Captain of soldiers
Does not give blessings with his weapons.
Soldiers' weapons are hated by most men,
Therefore he who has the Tao gives them no place.
In the dwelling of the man of peace the left side is the place of honour.
In soldiers' usage the right side is the place of honour.
A soldier does not give blessings with his weapons.
They are not the instruments of a man of peace.
A man of peace will not possess them, nor use them;
He gives the first place to calmness and repose.
If he conquers, he does not rejoice.
Without joy is he who wounds and kills men.
The Master who wounds and kills men
Cannot succeed in ruling his kingdom.
In time of joy, the left hand is preferred,
In time of mourning, the right hand is preferred.
In war, the second in command is placed on the left,
The first in command is placed on the right,
That is, he stands in the place of mourning.
He who has killed many men should weep with many tears.
He who has conquered in battle should stand in the place of mourning."

-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 31  


"Even victorious arms are unblest among tools, and people had better shun them.
Therefore he who has Reason does not rely on them.
The superior man when residing at home honors the left.
When using arms, he honors the right.
Arms are unblest among tools and not the superior man's tools.
Only when it is unavoidable he uses them.
Peace and quietude he holdeth high.
He conquers but rejoices not.
Rejoicing at a conquest means to enjoy the slaughter of men.
He who enjoys the slaughter of men will most assuredly not obtain his will in the empire."
-  Translated by Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki and Paul Carus, 1913, Chapter 31 



夫佳兵者不祥之器.
物或惡之, 故有道者不處.
君子居則貴左.
用兵則貴右.
兵者不祥之器.
非君子之器.
不得已而用之.
恬淡為上.
勝而不美.
而美之者, 是樂殺人.
夫樂殺人者, 則不可以得志於天下矣.
吉事尚左.
凶事尚右.
偏將軍居左.
上將軍居右.
言以喪禮處之.
殺人之衆, 以哀悲泣之.
戰勝以喪禮處之.

-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 31 



fu chia ping chê pu hsiang chih chi'i.
wu huo wu chih, ku yu tao chê pu ch'u.
chün tzu chü tsê kuei tso.
yung ping tsê kuei yu.
ping chê pu hsiang chih ch'i.
fei chün tzu chih ch'i.
pu tê yi erh yung chih.
t'ien tan wei shang.
shêng erh pu mei.
erh mei chih chê, shih lo sha jên.
fu lo sha jên chê, tsê pu k'o yi tê chih yü t'ien hsia yi.
chi shih shang tso.
hsiung shih shang yu.
p'ien chiang chün chü tso.
shang chiang chün chü yu.
yen yi sang li ch'u chih.
sha jên chih chung, yi ai pei ch'i chih.
chan shêng yi sang li ch'u chih.
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 31
  


"Even the finest warrior is defeated
     when he goes against natural law
By his own hand he is doomed
     and all creatures are likely to despise him

One who knows Tao
     never turns from life calling
When at home he honors the side of rest
When at war he honors the side of action
Peace and tranquility are what he holds most dear
     so he does not obtain weapons
But when their use is unavoidable
     he employs them with fortitude and zeal

Do not flaunt your excellence
Do not rejoice over victory
With the loss of others
     weep with sorrow and grief
After winning a battle
     do not celebrate
     observe the rites of a funeral

One who is bound to action, proud of victory,
    and delights in the misfortune of others
will never gain a thing
     from this world below Heaven"
-  Translation by Jonathan Star, 2001, Chapter 31 




"Weapons of war are instruments of death.
All people fear them.
Therefore, all men of peace avoid them.
The sage prefers Infinity.
The man of war prefers the earth.
Weapons are instruments of death
and the tools of a warrior.
The sage avoids them at all cost;
and sometimes prefers death rather
than touching them.
Peace and harmony are the sage's reality.
She considers victory to be the bastard
child of war.
If you revel in victory,
then you sanction war and the killing of
human beings.
If you accept killing,
you have forgotten your oneness with all
beings.
In time of celebration the left is the dominant
position;
In times of grief the right.
During wartime the general always stands on the
left
and the king on the right.
If even one person is killed in war,
it is cause for great grief and mourning.
Victory is simply the maker of widows and orphans."
-  Translated by John Worldpeace, Chapter 31   



"Las armas son instrumentos nefastos.
El hombre del Tao nunca se sirve de ellas.
El hombre de bien considera a la izquierda
como sitio de honor,
pero se inclina a la derecha cuando porta armas.
El sabio prefiere la izquierda.
El soldado prefiere la derecha.
Las armas son instrumentos nefastos,
no adecuados para el hombre de bien.
Sólo las usa en caso de necesidad,
y lo hace comedidamente,
sin alegría en la victoria.
El que se alegra de vencer
es el que goza con la muerte de los hombres.
Y quien se complace en matar hombres
no puede prevalecer en el mundo.
Para los grandes acontecimientos
el sitio de honor es la izquierda,
y la derecha para los hechos luctuosos.
En el ejército,
El comandante adjunto se coloca a la izquierda,
El comandante en jefe, a la derecha.
Esta es la misma disposición que se usa en los ritos fúnebres.
Esto significa que la guerra se compara a un servicio funerario.
Cuando ha sido matada mucha gente,
sólo es justo que los supervivientes lloren por los muertos.
Por esto, incluso una victoria es un funeral."
-  Translation from Wikisource, 2013
 



"The Killing Fields: War is a last resort 

Now, weapons are instruments of misfortune,
and despised by the whole world.
So those who are with the Tao will have nothing to do with them.

When a noble person is at home
he grants most importance to those at his left side.
But when he is at war
he grants most importance to those at his right side.

Weapons are instruments of misfortune.
They are not the instrument of the noble person.
Only when he has no choice will he use them.

It is best to be cool and calm. Victory is not beautiful.
But those who think it is beautiful, enjoy killing people.
Those who enjoy killing people
will not find what they want anywhere in the world.

In good times the place of honor is on the left.
In bad times the place of honor is on the right.
It is the second-in-command of the army who sits on the left,
and the first-in-command of the army who sits on the right.
This is to say;
these are the same positions they would take when at a funeral.

When a great number of people have been killed,
it is an occasion for sorrow and mourning.
When the battle is won, conduct a funeral for those slain."
-  Translated by Roderic and Amy Sorrell, 2003, Chapter 31  



"Of all things, soldiers are instruments of evil,
   Hated by men.
Therefore the religious man (possessed of Tao) avoids them.
The gentleman favors the left in civilian life,
But on military occasions favors the right.
Soldiers are weapons of evil.
   They are not the weapons of the gentleman.
When the use of soldiers cannot be helped,
   The best policy is calm restraint.
Even in victory, there is no beauty,
And who calls it beautiful
   Is one who delights in slaughter.
He who delights in slaughter
   Will not succeed in his ambition to rule the world.
[The things of good omen favor the left.
The things of ill omen favor the right.
The lieutenant-general stands on the left,
The general stands on the right.
That is to say, it is celebrated as a Funeral Rite.]
The slaying of multitudes should be mourned with sorrow.
A victory should be celebrated with the Funeral Rite."
-  Translated by Lin Yutang, 1955, Chapter 31  



A typical webpage created by Mike Garofalo for each one of the 81 Chapters (Verses, Sections) of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) includes 25 different English language translations or interpolations for that Chapter, 5 Spanish language translations for that Chapter, the Chinese characters for that Chapter, the Wade-Giles and Hanyu Pinyin transliterations (Romanization) of the Mandarin Chinese words for that Chapter, and 2 German and 1 French translation of that Chapter.  Each webpage for each one of the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching includes extensive indexing by key words, phrases, and terms for that Chapter in English, Spanish, and the Wade-Giles Romanization.  Each webpage on a Chapter of the Daodejing includes recommended reading in books and websites, a detailed bibliography, some commentary, research leads, translation sources, a Google Translate drop down menu, and other resources for that Chapter.  These are hypertext documents, and available online under Creative Commons 4.

Chapter 31, Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu. Complied by Mike Garofalo.

Chapter and Thematic Index (Concordance) to the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu


Concordance, Alphabetical Subject Index, Chapters 1-25.

English Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index

Spanish Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: A Selected Reading List

A Solitary Daoist Neopagan's Final Journey

An Old Philosopher's Notebooks

How to Live a Good Life: Advice from Wise Persons










Thursday, March 07, 2019

Benefits of Playing Music

The Benefits of Playing Music Help Your Brain
More Than Any Other Activity

By John Rampton, 2017

"Long-Lasting Benefits for Musicians

Brain-scanning studies have found that the anatomical change in musicians' brains is related to the age when training began. It shouldn't be surprising, but learning at a younger age causes the most drastic changes.

Interestingly, even brief periods of musical training can have long-lasting benefits. A 2013 study found that even those with moderate musical training preserved sharp processing of speech sounds. It was also able to increase resilience to any age-related decline in hearing.

Researchers also believe that playing music helps speech processing and learning in children with dyslexia. Furthermore, learning to play an instrument as a child can protect the brain against dementia.

"Music reaches parts of the brain that other things can't," says Loveday. "It's a strong cognitive stimulus that grows the brain in a way that nothing else does, and the evidence that musical training enhances things like working memory and language is very robust."

Other Ways Learning an Instrument Strengthens Your Brain

Guess what? We're still not done. Here are eight additional ways that learning an instrument strengthens your brain.

1. Strengthens bonds with others. This shouldn't be surprising. Think about your favorite band. They can only make a record when they have contact, coordination, and cooperation with one another.

2. Strengthens memory and reading skills. The Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory at Northwestern University states this is because music and reading are related via common neural and cognitive mechanisms.

3. Playing music makes you happy. McMaster University discovered that babies who took interactive music classes displayed better early communication skills. They also smiled more.

4. Musicians can process multiple things at once. As mentioned above, this is because playing music forces you to process multiple senses at once. This can lead to superior multisensory skills.

5. Music increases blood flow in your brain. Studies have found that short bursts of musical training increase the blood flow to the left hemisphere of the brain. That can be helpful when you need a burst of energy. Skip the energy drink and jam for 30 minutes.

6. Music helps the brain recover. Motor control improved in everyday activities with stroke patients.

7. Music reduces stress and depression. A study of cancer patients found that listening to and playing music reduced anxiety. Another study revealed that music therapy lowered levels of depression and anxiety.

8. Musical training strengthens the brain's executive function. Executive function covers critical tasks like processing and retaining information, controlling behavior, making decisions, and problem solving. If strengthened, you can boost your ability to live. Musical training can improve and strengthen executive functioning in both children and adults."

Wednesday, March 06, 2019

Northwest Fighting Arts in Portland

Northwest Fighting Arts (NWFA)

Sifu Jeff Patterson

1200 SE Morrison St
Portland, Oregon 97214
Phone: 503-235-3435
Buckman, Belmont, Southeast Portland Area

I enrolled in the Tai Chi and Qigong Training Program at NWFA
on March 4, 2019.  The Dojo is 20 miles by freeway from my home in Vancouver.  They offer Tai Chi and Qigong classes 10 times each week.  

At my home, doing the Qigong Walking Exercises for improving my balance and concentration that is taught at NWFA.  Also, practicing the Tai Chi Yang 24 and Yang 108.  Sifu Patterson said everyone is first taught to do a 37 movement form designed by Sifu Sam Tam.  It is not the 37 form of Cheng Man-ch'ing.  












Tuesday, March 05, 2019

Deer Frolics Qigong



"The Deer Play is to imitate the shape and movement of a deer hoping to attain long life and pure soul like a deer. The features of a deer are its gentle disposition, swift movement, love to push with horns, and good at running. When it stands it likes to stretch its neck to glance at things afar. The deer also likes looking at left and right and its rear foot. It is also good at moving its tail bones (sacrum). The tail bone is the place where the Jen and Du meridians meet. Thus, during practice, the practitioner not only needs to imitate the attitude of a deer with swift movement and calm spirit, but also need to focus attention on the tail bone. This will guide Qi to the whole body, open meridians, circulate blood, relax tendons and bones, and benefit kidney and strengthen waist. It can also enhance blood circulation in the abdomen. This play is suitable for curing dysfunctional nerves in the internal organs, chronicle infections of the internal organs in the abdomen, fatigue in the waist muscles, nerve pain in the pelvis, deteriorated thigh bones, and the lack of sex drives."
- Five Animal Frolics

"Breathing in and out in various manners, spitting out the old and taking in the new, walking like a bear and stretching their neck like a bird to achieve longevity - this is what such practitioners of Daoyin, cultivators of the body and all those searching for long life like Ancestor Peng, enjoy." - Chuang-tzu, circa 300 BCE.


"Firstly, we analyze its function in the aspect of psychological regulation as it is required that the practitioner should do it before and during each routines in the exercise of the Health Qigong Wu Qin Xi. The practitioner should mind on the Dantian and rid of the distracted thoughts with quiet mind and spirit before the exercise, get into the imitation of its physical activities of each animal in the exercise. When practicing the tiger exercise, try to imagine yourself as a fierce tiger in the mountains who is looking down upon other beasts and stretching its own pawns and about to pounce on its prey; in the deer exercise, imagine that you are prudent and mild, jogging on a green field; in the exercise of the bear, you are a clumsy bear, composed and steady, freely roaming the forests; in the monkey exercise, you become a happy and agile monkey; in the bird exercise, you are a free bird with quiet mind and flying in the sky. Therefore you can continuously regulate the mind state in the exercise and it is helpful to the relaxation of the mind. The regular exercise of this skill can transform and regulate the mind of the practitioner to relieve the spiritual nervousness, improve the emotional stability, reduce the mental stress and keep the healthy mind."
- The Effect of Precaution against Sub-health of the Health Qigong Wu Qin Xi. Chinese Health Qigong Association. 2008. 

Monday, March 04, 2019

R. H. Blyth (1898-1964)


Reginald Horace Blyth (1898-1964)   
Bibliography, Biography, Links, Resources, Quotations, Comments, Influence, Zen, Haiku
Hypertext Notebook by Michael P. Garofalo






"These are some of the characteristics of the state of mind which the creation and appreciation of haiku demand: Selflessness, Loneliness, Grateful Acceptance, Wordlessness, Non-intellectuality, Contradictoriness, Humor, Freedom, Non-morality, Simplicity, Materiality, Love, and Courage."
- Haiku, Volume One, p. 154


"The love of nature is religion, and that religion is poetry; these three things are one thing. This is the unspoken creed of haiku poets."
- History of Haiku, Vol. One, Introduction, 8.5


"The object of our lives is to look at, listen to, touch, taste things. Without them, - these sticks, stones, feathers, shells, - there is no Deity."
- R. H. Blyth, Zen in English Literature and Oriental Classics, p. 144.


"The sun shines, snow falls, mountains rise and valleys sink, night deepens and pales into day, but it is only very seldom that we attend to such things ... When we are grasping the inexpressible meaning of these things, this is life, this is living. To do this twenty-four hours a day is the Way of Haiku. It is having life more abundantly."
- R. H. Blyth, Haiku, Volume One, p. 11