Friday, November 17, 2017

Chen 19 Form of Grandmaster Chen Xiao Wang

I began learning this Tai Chi form from Sifu David Fetyko in Vancouver, Washington, in October of 2017.

I am just beginning my hypertext notebook on the subject.  











Chen Taijiquan 19 Form.  Instructional DVD by Sifu Ken Gullette.  NTSC format, 105 minutes.  Amazon  English language narration with excellent audio track.  Very good video quality.  The form is demonstrated in its entirety from both front and back views.  Sifu Gullette provides detailed instructions for each movement and some coaching of a student.  His descriptions are clear, accurate, and very informative.  VSCL. 

Chen Taijiquan 19 Form: A Detailed Step-by-Step Reference for the Short Beginner's Form of Chen Tai Chi.  EBook by Sifu Ken Gullette.  Internal Fighting Arts, 2013, 250 pages, more than 200 photographs.  Promotional review of EBook.  "With more than 200 photographs and detailed instruction on body mechanics, this book is unlike any Taiji instructional book you've ever seen. It provides a detailed, step-by-step, frame-by-frame reference for the short beginner's form of Chen Tai Chi. A lot of books show a movement, then the next movement, but sometimes, books do not show specifically how to get from one movement to the next. In this book, Ken Gullette shows all the details. The Chen 19 Form takes about 5 minutes to perform. It was designed in 1995 by Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang, a direct descendant of Tai Chi's creator, Chen Wangting. Grandmaster Chen designed the 19 Form after being asked by students around the world for a shorter form than the 75-movement Laojia Yilu. He based the 19 Form primarily on the longer form. Ken Gullette learned the Chen 19 Form beginning in 1998 from his teachers, Jim and Angela Criscimagna of Rockford, Illinois, and from their teacher, Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang, who visited Rockford to teach Chen Taiji workshops. This is the first in a two-part series of e-books. The second volume will teach self-defense applications of the movements in the Chen 19 Form. In this book, Ken shows the movements and reminds you of what is happening inside, including the ground path, spiraling, whole-body movement, peng jin, Dan T'ien rotation, and opening/closing the kua. The book is a companion and reference for Ken's Chen 19 Form DVD, but the book was designed to stand alone as an instructional tool. Ken began studying martial arts in 1973 at the age of 20, inspired by Bruce Lee and the Kung-Fu TV show. It became a way of life. He is a tournament champion, winning trophies from 1974 to 2013, including two National Titles at the 1990 AAU Kung Fu National Championships, and numerous tournament wins for forms, weapons, and sparring. Ken began teaching in 1997 and still teaches a small group of students in the Quad Cities (Iowa and Illinois) plus his membership website has members around the world, and he teaches through DVDs and ebooks. Ken is a teacher and a student, always working to get better and passing on what he learns to those who are not as far along the path of internal kung-fu."  - Amazon  Purchase EBook from Amazon for $4.99.  VSCL. 

Chen Taiji Self-Defense, Fighting Applications of the Chen Family Tai Chi 19 Form.  By Sifu Ken Gullette.  Kindle E Book, 2013.  202 pages. 


Chen Taijiquan 19 Short Form  A PDF file that includes detailed descriptions of each movement, 12 pages, 2011.  From Madison Chen Style Taijiquan Studio.

Tao Te Ching, Chapter 4

Daodejing, Laozi
Chapter 4


"Tao is like an empty vessel,
yet use will not drain it.
Never needing to be filled,
it is the deep and unfathomable source
of the ten thousand things.

Blunt the sharpness.
Untangle the knots.
Soften the glare.
Settle like dust.
Let your wheels move only along old ruts.

Darkly visible,
it only seems as if it were there.
I know not its name.
It existed before the ten thousand things.
I call it Tao."
-  Translated by Kari Hohne, 2009, Chapter 4  



"Tao is a whirling emptiness, yet when used it cannot be exhausted.
Out of this mysterious well flows everything in existence.
Blunting sharp edges, Untangling knots, Softening the glare, It evolves us all and makes the whole world one.
Something is there, hidden and deep!
But I do not know whose child it is.
It came even before God."
-  Translated by Brian Browne Walker, 1996, Chapter 4  


"Tao is infinite.
If we use It, we find It inexhaustible,
Deep!
It appears to be Ancestor of all things.
It rounds our angles. It unravels our difficulties. It harmonizes our Light. It brings our atoms into Unity.
Pure!
It appears to be everlasting in principle.
I do not know whose Son It is,
It existed before God was manifest in Form."
-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 4 



"The Tao is like an empty bowl, 
Which in being used can never be filled up.
Fathomless, it seems to be the origin of all things.
It blunts all sharp edges,
It unties all tangles,
It harmonizes all lights,
It unites the world into one whole.
Hidden in the deeps,
Yet it seems to exist for ever.
I do not know whose child it is;
It seems to be the common ancestor of all, the father  of things."
-  Translated by John C. H. Wu, 1961, Chapter 4  




道沖而用之或不盈.
淵兮似萬物之宗.
挫其銳.
解其紛.
和其光同其塵.
湛兮似或存.
吾不知誰之子.
象帝之先.
-  Chinese characters, Chapter 4, Tao Te Ching


dao chang er yong zhi huo bu ying.
yuan xi si wan wu zhi zong.
cuo qi rui.
jie qi fen.
he qi guang tong qi chen.
zhan xi si huo cun.
wu bu zhi shui zhi zi.
xiang di zhi xian.  
-  Pinyin Romanization, Chapter 4, Daodejing





"Existence, by nothing bred,
Breeds everything.
Parent of the universe,
It smoothes rough edges,
Unties hard knots,
Tempers the sharp sun,
Lays blowing dust,
Its image in the wellspring never fails.
But how was it conceived?--this image
Of no other sire."
-  Translated by Witter Bynner, 1944, Chapter 4 



"Tao is empty, used yet never filled.
It is deep, like the forefather of all things.
It dulls sharpness, and sorts tangles,
Blends with the light, becoming one with the dust.
So serene, as if it hardly existed.
I do not know whose son it is.
It seems to have preceded God."
-  Translated by Paul J. Lin, Chapter 4 



"El Tao es como un jarrón
que el uso nunca llena.
Es iqual que un abismo,
origen de todas las cosas del mundo.

El embota cualquier filo,
El desmadeja cualquier ovillo,
El fusiona todas las cuces,
El unifica todos los polvos.

El parece muy frofundo,
parece durar siempre.
Higo de un no sé qué,
debe de ser el antepasado de los dioses."
-  Translated by Alba, 1998, Tao Te Ching, Capítulo 4 



"The subtle Way of the universe appears to lack strength,
yet its power is inexhaustible.
Fathomless, it could be the origin of all things.
It has no sharpness,
yet it rounds off all sharp edges.
It has no form,
yet it unties all tangles.
It has no glare,
yet it merges all lights.
It harmonizes all things and unites them as one integral whole.
It seems so obscure,
yet it is the Ultimate Clarity.
Whose offspring it is can never be known.
It is that which existed before any divinity."
-  Translated by Hua-Ching Ni, 1995, Chapter 4  



"Tao is an empty vessel;
it is used but never exhausted.
It is the fathomless source
of the ten thousand beings!
It blunts the sharp
and untangles the knots.
It softens the glare
and unites with the dust of the world.
It is tranquil and serene
and endures forever.
I don't know form where it comes
yet it is the ancestor of all."
-  Translated by Solala Towler, 2016, Chapter 4 



"Tao is a container
Though used again and again
It is never full
Profound!  As though the ancestor of all things

Rounding the points
Untying the knots
Softening the glare
Unifying the dust


Tranquil!  Although having a life of its own
I do not know whose child it is
It appears to have preceded the primordial ruler"
-  Translated by Dan G. Reid, 2016, Chapter 4 



"The Tao is like an empty container: 
 it can never be emptied and can never be filled.
 Infinitely deep, it is the source of all things.
 It dulls the sharp, unties the knotted,
 shades the lighted, and unites all of creation with dust.

It is hidden but always present.
 I don't know who gave birth to it.
 It is older than the concept of God."
-  Translated by John H. McDonald, 1996, Chapter 4  





A typical webpage created by Mike Garofalo for each one of the 81 Chapters (Verses, Sections) of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) includes 25 different English language translations or interpolations for that Chapter, 5 Spanish language translations for that Chapter, the Chinese characters for that Chapter, the Wade-Giles and Hanyu Pinyin transliterations (Romanization) of the Mandarin Chinese words for that Chapter, and 2 German and 1 French translation of that Chapter.  Each webpage for each one of the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching includes extensive indexing by key words, phrases, and terms for that Chapter in English, Spanish, and the Wade-Giles Romanization.  Each webpage on a Chapter of the Daodejing includes recommended reading in books and websites, a detailed bibliography, some commentary, research leads, translation sources, a Google Translate drop down menu, and other resources for that Chapter.  These are hypertext documents, and available online under Creative Commons 4.

  

Chapter 4, Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu.  Compiled and indexed by Mike Garofalo.  

Chapter and Thematic Index (Concordance) to the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu


English Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index


Spanish Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index


Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices


Taoism: A Selected Reading List






Thursday, November 16, 2017

Walking Indoors




The above photograph was taken in November of 2009. 
I was walking along Kilkenny Lane in Red Bluff, California.  


Lately, in November of 2017, I've been doing aerobic exercise indoors by using a combination of treadmill, elliptical, and bicycle machines.  I do this activity five days a week, for 45 to 60 minutes each day.  I stay dry and warm while doing this indoor aerobic exercise activity.  


"Putting facts by the thousands,
into the world, the toes take off
with an appealing squeak which the thumping heel
follows confidentially, the way men greet men.
Sometimes walking is just such elated
pumping."
- Lyn Hejinian, Determination


The Ways of Walking Website

Walking Meditation





Image result for elliptical machine



Image result for indoor bicycle

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Chen Tai Chi Chuan, Old Frame, First Form

Chen Style Taijiquan, Old Frame First Form, Lao Jia Yi Lu
A hypertext notebook by Michael P. Garofalo.  


This webpage includes a detailed bibliography of books, media, and articles.  Extensive selection of Internet links. 
List of movement names in English, Chinese characters, Chinese Pinyin, French, German, and Spanish; and citations for sources of the movement names. 
Detailed list of DVDs and videos available online.

Extensive notes on the author's learning the Old Frame, First Routine, Lao Jia Yi Lu; and on learning Chen Style Taijiquan. 
Record of performance times of this form by many masters. 
Breakdown by sections of the form, with separate lists for each section.  General   information, history, facts, information, pointers, and quotations.  





Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Tao Te Ching Commentary

Daodejing Commentary, Index, Concordance


Chapter Index to the Tao Te Ching


Concordance to the Tao Te Ching

English Language Versions of the Tao Te Ching - Translator's Index

Spanish Language Versions of the Dao De Jing

Thematic Index to the Tao Te Ching

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: A Bibliography

An Old Philosopher's Notebooks

Cloud Hands Blog Posts About the Daodejing



Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Tao Te ChingChapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Subject Index
 
12345678910
11121314151617181920
21222324252627282930
31323334353637383940
41424344454647484950
51525354555657585960
61626364656667686970
71727374757677787980
81



A typical webpage created by Mike Garofalo for each one of the 81 Chapters (Verses, Sections) of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) includes up to 25 different English language translations or interpolations for that Chapter, 5 Spanish language translations for that Chapter, the Chinese characters for that Chapter, the Wade-Giles and Hanyu Pinyin transliterations (Romanization) of the Mandarin Chinese words for that Chapter, and 2 German and 1 French translation of that Chapter.  Each webpage for each one of the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching includes extensive indexing by key words, phrases, and terms for that Chapter in English, Spanish, and the Wade-Giles Romanization.  Each webpage on a Chapter of the Daodejing includes recommended reading in books and websites, a detailed bibliography, some commentary, research leads, translation sources, a Google Translate drop down menu, and other resources for that Chapter.   







They Speak to Me, and My Heart Soars


"The beauty of the trees,
the softness of the air,
the fragrance of the grass,
speaks to me.
The summit of the mountain,
the thunder of the sky,
speaks to me.
The faintness of the stars,
the trail of the sun,
the strength of fire,
and the life that never goes away,
they speak to me.
And my heart soars."
-  Chief Dan George  


"I did however used to think, you know, in the woods walking, and as a kid playing the the woods, that there was a kind of immanence there - that woods, a places of that order, had a sense, a kind of presence, that you could feel; that there was something peculiarly, physically present, a feeling of place almost conscious ... like God.  It evoked that."
-  Robert Creely, Robert Creely and the Genius of the American Common Place, p. 40   



"I like to walk about amidst the beautiful things that adorn the world."
- George Santayana


Zen Poetry

Buddhism

Haiku Poetry

Gardening and Spirituality

Trees





Monday, November 13, 2017

Taijiquan and Virtues

"Perhaps the want of literature addressing heartfulness in the realm of T'ai Chi stems from the very personal nature of the topic.  Our paths are unique, and along these paths each of us may or may not choose to confront our own standards of integrity and morality while exploring our potential for becoming fully realized spiritual/human beings.  For myself, the issues of morality, integrity, empathy, responsibility, respect and appreciation for life, purposefulness, and joy are inextricably woven into the pursuit of martial arts mastery, and particularly so in the case of internal arts such as T'ai Chi.  This is not to say that I consider there to be only one constant standard for any of these qualities, and certainly I do not see myself as the designated arbiter of any such standards.  I do believe, however, that T'ai Chi practitioners have a unique opportunity, and an incentive, to explore and expand their growth.  They can develop heartfulness according to their own individual scope by virtue of T'ai Chi's emphasis on integrative mind/body experience through the discipline of practice.  To me, this only seems congruent with T'ai Chi's alleged potential as a tool for mastery of self."
-  John Loupos, Inside Tai Chi, 2002, p. 74


"Philosophical ideals in the martial arts:
1. To strive for perfection of character
2. To defend the paths of truth
3. To foster the spirit of effort
4. To honor the principles of etiquette
5. To guard against impetuous courage."

- Herman Kauz, The Martial Spirit: An Introduction to the Origin, Philosophy and Psychology of the Martial Arts.


Sunday, November 12, 2017

You Can't Dance and Stay Uptight

Dancing in the Moonlight
By King Harvest
1972

"We get it almost every night
When that moon gets big and bright
It's supernatural delight
Everybody was dancing in the moonlight

Everybody here is out of sight
They don't bark and they don't bite
They keep things loose, they keep things light
Everybody was dancing in the moonlight

Dancing in the moonlight
Everybody feeling warm and bright
It's such a fine and natural sight
Everybody's dancing in the moonlight

We like our fun and we never fight
You can't dance and stay uptight
It's supernatural delight
Everybody was dancing in the moonlight

Dancing in the moonlight
Everybody's feeling warm and bright
It's such a fine and natural sight
Everybody's dancing in the moonlight

Dancing in the moonlight
Everybody's feeling warm and bright
It's such a fine and natural sight
Everybody's dancing in the moonlight"




Saturday, November 11, 2017

Veteran's Day


We attended an elementary school assembly for Veteran's Day last Thursday.

The principal and staff kept over 800 people productive, safe, respectful, and responsible. All veterans were honored.

I am a proud veteran of serving elementary school students in libraries and schools for 50 years.

I once served in the U.S. Air Force from 1969-1973, Air Training Command.
However, weapons and warrior soldiers are bad omens to me. 

Peace, Productivity, Prosperity, Satisfaction, Growth, Progress, Learning


The post assembly photo includes Makenna, Casey and I.  They are two very smart fourth grade students at Chinook Elementary School in Salmon Creek, Vancouver, Washington.    







Productive Relationships

"If I can create a relationship characterized on my part:
 by a genuineness and transparency, in which I am my real feelings;
 by a warm acceptance of and prizing of the other person as a separate individual;
 by a sensitive ability to see his world and himself as he sees them;
 Then the other individual in the relationship:
 will experience and understand aspects of himself which previously he as repressed;
 will find himself becoming better integrated, more able to function effectively;
 will become more similar to the person he would like to be;
 will be more self-directing and self-confident;
 will become more of a person, more unique and more self-expressive;
 will be more understanding, more acceptant of others;
 will be able to cope with the problems of life more adequately and more comfortably."


 
On Becoming a Person: A Therapist's View of Psychotherapy, p. 37.  By Carl R. Rogers.  Written around 1955. 
  


How to Live a Good Life: Advice From Wise Persons

Virtue Ethics

Aging Well



Friday, November 10, 2017

Dao De Jing, Laozi, Chapter 3

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu
Chapter 3

"If no distinctions of superiority and inferiority prevail among officers, they will devote themselves to their tasks rather than to rivalries with one another.
If no special value is placed upon rare things, one will have no incentive for stealing them.
If nothing appears to arouse envy, one will remain satisfied with things as they are
Since this is so, the wise administrator does not lead people to set their hearts upon what they cannot have, but satisfies their inner needs. He does not promote ambition to improve their status, but supports their self-sufficiency. He does not complicate their lives with knowledge of multifarious details or with an urge to attend to this, that and the other.
By keeping people contented, he prevents those who mistakenly believe that ambition is better than contentment from leading the contented astray.
By being calm and contented himself, he sets an example for his people."
-  Translated by Archie J. Bahm, 1958, Chapter 3  



"Not exalting ability ensures that the people do not strive.
Not prizing goods that are difficult to obtain ensures that the people do not become robbers.
Not showing them what they might desire ensures that the people do not feel disturbed in their hearts.
Therefore the Saint, in the exercise of government, empties their hearts and fills their bellies, weakens their wills and strengthens their bones, thus constantly ensuring that the people are without knowledge and without desires and that those who have knowledge dare not act.
He practices Non-action and consequently there is nothing that is not well governed."
-  Translated by Jan J. L. Duyvendak, 1954, Chapter 3  



"When you praise people for their achievements, people will compete
When you call things valuable, people will steal
When people flaunt desirable things, it will make other people restless
Therefore the sage sets himself to the task of emptying their heads
To make sure they're not hungry, discourage their ambitions and strengthen their bodies
So people will be without anxiety and without the desire for knowledge
And the scientists will be played off the field
When people won't labour anymore
All will live in peace."
-  Translated by Anonymous, Chapter 3  




"Rewarding not the talented from fierce contention frees,
With wealth unprized, the people will not take to thievish arts,
Not seeing what awakes desire will keep the mind at ease,
And so the sage' s governing unloads the people' s hearts.
He fills the stomach, strengthens bones, and calms the daring will,
He causes people not to know desires they should not hold,
And those who know of such he keeps, from reckless daring, still,
He acts the nothing acting, and there' s nothing uncontrolled."
-  Translated by Isaac Winter Heysinger, 1903, Chapter 3  




不尚賢, 使民不爭; 不貴難得之貨, 使民不為盜.
不見可欲, 使心不亂.
是以聖人之治.
虛其心.
實其腹.
弱其志.
強其骨.
常使民無知無欲.
使夫知者不敢為也.
為無為.
則無不治. 
-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 3  


pu shang hsien, shih min pu chêng; pu kuei nan tê chih huo, shih min pu wei tao.
pu chien k'o yü, shih min hsin pu luan.
shih yi shêng jên chih chih. 
hsü ch'i hsin.
shih ch'i fu.
jo ch'i chih.
ch'iang ch'i ku.
ch'ang shih min wu chih wu yü. 
shih fu chih chê pu kan wei yeh. 
wei wu wei.
tsê wu pu chih.
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 3  


"If those who are excellent find no preferment,
The people will cease to contend for promotion.
If goods that are hard to obtain are not favored,
The people will cease to turn robbers or bandits.
If things much desired are kept under cover,
Disturbance will cease in the minds of the people.
The Wise Man's policy, accordingly,
Will be to empty people's hearts and minds,
To fill their bellies, weaken their ambition,
Give them sturdy frames and always so,
To keep them uniformed, without desire,
And knowing ones not venturing to act.
Be still while you work
And keep full control
Over all."
-  Translated by Raymond Blakney, 1955, Chapter 3  



"Exalt not the wise, 
So that the people shall not scheme and contend;
Prize not rare objects,
So that the people shall not steal;
Shut out from site the things of desire,
So that the people's hearts shall not be disturbed.
Therefore in the government of the Sage:
He keeps empty their hearts
Makes full their bellies,
Discourages their ambitions,
Strengthens their frames;
So that the people may be innocent of knowledge and desires.
And the cunning ones shall not presume to interfere.
By action without deeds
May all live in peace."
-  Translated by Lin Yutang, 1955, Chapter 3  



"Si no se eleva a los hombres de mérito,
no habrá disputas entre el pueblo.
Si no se valoran los objetos difíciles de conseguir,
no existirán ladrones en el pueblo.
Si no se deja ver lo que puede provocar el deseo,
no se producirán disturbios populares.
Por eso el gobierno del sabio es:
vaciar la mente del pueblo,
y llenar su estómago;
debilitar su ambición,
y fortalecer sus huesos.
Hacer siempre que el pueblo no tenga conocimientos, ni deseos.
Hacer que los inteligentes no se atrevan (a gobernar);
no actuar, en una palabra,
y entonces reinará el orden universal."
-  Translated by Juan Ignacio Preciado, 1978, Tao Te Ching, Capítulo 3 



"When the superior are not exalted, envy will not be aroused.
Then there will be no rivalry or contention among people.
When wealth is not treasured, desire for possessions will not be stirred up.
Then people will not be tempted to rob one another.
By shutting that which is desirable out of sight, the heart will remain undisturbed.
Then there will be no confusion in the hearts of people.
The guidance of the Universal One of natural wholeness is therefore:
Empty your mind.
Enjoy good health.
Weaken your ambitions.
Strengthen your essence.
When people are free from cunning, desire, and artifice, everything will be well-ordered of its own accord."
-  Translated by Ni Hua-Ching, 1995, Chapter 3



"Bestowing honor breeds ambitions.
 Hoarding treasure invites thieves.
 Displaying objects of desire sows the seeds of discontent.
 Therefore the sage governs
 by emptying minds and filling bellies,
 by weakening wills and strengthening bones.
 He extols the virtue of desireless unknowing
 and keeps intellects off balance.
 When not-doing is accomplished,
 nothing remains undone."
 -  Translated by Bart Marshall, 2006, Chapter 3




A typical webpage created by Mike Garofalo for each one of the 81 Chapters (Verses, Sections) of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) includes 25 different English language translations or interpolations for that Chapter, 5 Spanish language translations for that Chapter, the Chinese characters for that Chapter, the Wade-Giles and Hanyu Pinyin transliterations (Romanization) of the Mandarin Chinese words for that Chapter, and 2 German and 1 French translation of that Chapter.  Each webpage for each one of the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching includes extensive indexing by key words, phrases, and terms for that Chapter in English, Spanish, and the Wade-Giles Romanization.  Each webpage on a Chapter of the Daodejing includes recommended reading in books and websites, a detailed bibliography, some commentary, research leads, translation sources, a Google Translate drop down menu, and other resources for that Chapter.  These are hypertext documents, and available online under Creative Commons 4.

  

Chapter 3, Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu.  Compiled and indexed by Mike Garofalo.  

Chapter and Thematic Index (Concordance) to the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu


English Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index


Spanish Language Daodejing Translators' Source Index


Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices


Taoism: A Selected Reading List







Thursday, November 09, 2017

Walking Benefits

"It engages your buttocks with the world
It modestly reduces fat
It improves glycemic control, especially after meals
It improves triglyceride levels and lowers blood pressure, especially after meals
It might help you live longer if you do it briskly
It is well tolerated by people with arthritis
It is good for your brain
It reduces stress
It boosts immune function
It helps prevent falls in the elderly
It gives you a chance to think
It can be a kind of meditation
It is in your blood, in your genes
It enables recognition of the felt presence of immediate experience."
-  Mark Sisson, Reasons to Walk this Year, 2014



"Walking might:
Allow you to see new aspects of your local environment
Make you a bit mellower and more peaceful
Set a good example for others
Enable you to meet other people and dogs
Make for good conversations with a friend while walking
Engender more gratefulness and kindness
Lift your mood and improve your attitude
Give you time to think, reflect, or contemplate alone
Energize your body, mind, and spirit
Bring new scents and smells to your nostrils
Provide mystical experiences and epiphanies
Reduce or resolve your worries 
Enjoying good memories or testing your memory 
Allow you to feel and see the effects of our invisible Air
Give you more confidence in achieving your goals
Get you in better awareness of your feelings
Change your perspective 
Allow you to help with neighborhood watch
Let you be alone for awhile
Make your legs feel good
Appreciate the beauty in our world
Allow you to come under the 'Spell of the Sensuous'
Provide some time for listening to music or lectures
Reduce the onset or ameliorate physical ailments or diseases."
-  Michael P. Garofalo, Ways of Walking, October 2016  




Ways of Walking Website:  Quotations, Information, Facts, Poetry, Inspiration

Benefits of Walking

Caloric Expenditures While Walking

Walking Meditation

Exercise Options for Older Persons

Aging Well




Wednesday, November 08, 2017

Awareness Through Movement

My wife, Karen, has persistent painful problems with her upper back and neck.  Arthritis, head tilted forward, upper back rounded, injuries, and 70 years of active use have all causally contributed to her discomfort.  My own back has been cramping up lately on the mid and lower right side.  We both are doing restorative yoga, massage, and heat treatments.  

We have found a local Feldenkrais practitioner, Christine Toscano, that we both will visit for lessons starting in November.  Ms. Toscano also had a career as a licensed acupuncturist. 

Ms. Toscano recommended we read Chapter 5 of the book by Norman Doidge, M.D., "The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity," (Penguin Books, 2016).  The chapter covers the life and work of Moshe Feldenkrais (1904-1984).  He was a engineer, kudo master, movement therapist, and healer.  The chapter discusses some of the core principles of his theory and methods as follows:

"1.  The mind programs the functioning of the brain.
2.  A brain cannot think without motor function.
3.  Awareness of movement is the key to improving movement.
4.  Differentiation: making the smallest possible sensory distinctions between movements - builds brain maps.
5.  Differentiation is easiest to make when the stimulus is smallest.
6.  Slowness of movement is the key to awareness, and awareness is the key to learning.
7.  Reduce the effort whenever possible.  Relax.
8.  Errors are essential, and there is no right way to move, only better.
9.  Random movements provide variation that leads to developmental breakthroughs.
10.  Even the smallest movement in one part of the body involves the entire body.
11.  Many movement problems, and the pain that goes with them, are caused by learned habit, not by abnormal structure." 


Awareness Through Movement by Moshe Feldenkrais

Change Your Age by Frank Wildman


Moshe Feldenkrais.png


Tuesday, November 07, 2017

Realizing All Pervasive Zen in the Midst of All Activities

"This is the realm of true reality where you forget what is on your mind and stop looking.  In a wild field, not choosing, picking up whatever comes to hand, the obvious meaning of Zen is clear in the hundred grasses.  Indeed, the green bamboo, the clusters of yellow flowers, fences, walls, tiles, and pebble us the teaching of the inanimate; rivers, birds, trees, and groves expound suffering, emptiness, and selflessness.  This is based on the one true reality, producing unconditional compassion, manifesting uncontrived, supremely wondrous power in the great jewel light of nirvana.

An ancient master said, "Meeting a companion on the Way, spending a life together, the whole task of study is done."  Another master said, "If I pick up a single leaf and go into the city, I move the whole of the mountain."  That is why one ancient adept was enlightened on hearing the sound of pebbles striking bamboo, while another was awakened on seeing peach trees in bloom.  An ancient worthy, working in the fields in his youth , was breaking up clumps of earth when he saw a big clod, which he playfully smashed with a fierce blow; as it shattered, he was suddenly greatly enlightened.  One Zen master attained enlightenment on seeing the flagpole of a teaching center from the other side of a river.  Another spoke of the staff of the spirit.  One adept illustrated Zen realization by planting a hoe in the ground; another master spoke of Zen in term of sowing the fields.  All of these instances were bringing out this indestructible true being, allowing people to visit a greatly liberated true teacher without moving a step.

Carrying out the unspoken teaching, attaining unhindered eloquence, thus they forever studied all over from all things, embracing the all-inclusive universe, detaching from both abstract and concrete definitions of buddhahood, and transcendentally realizing universal, all pervasive Zen in the midst of all activities.  Why necessarily consider holy places, teachers' abodes, or religious organizations and forms prerequisite to personal familiarity and attainment of realization?"

-  Yuan-Wu, The House of Lin-Chi, "The Five Houses of Zen," translated by Thomas Cleary, Shambhala Press, 1997, p. 58.  

Spirtiuality and Gardening

Monday, November 06, 2017

Teachable Virtues for Children

Twenty Teachable Virtues for Children

Empathy
Helpfulness
Fairness
Tolerance
Caring
Courage
Humor
Respect
Loyalty
Courtesy
Patience
Resourcefulness
Peacemaking
Self-Reliance
Self-Motivation
Responsibility
Honesty
Trustworthiness
Self-Discipline
Cooperation



-  Barbra C. Unell and Jerry L Wyckoff, "20 Teachable Virtues: Practical Ways to Pass on Lessons of Virtue and Character to Your Children," 1995


How to Live a Good Life: Advice from Wise Persons

Virtue Ethics








I worked part-time for the Corning Union Elementary School District (5 schools, K-8) from 1999-2016 as the Technology and Media Services Supervisor, and District Librarian. My office was in the Maywood Middle School, serving public school students in the 6th to 8th grades, ages 11 to 14. 

Teachers and staff tried our best to create a safe, positive and productive educational environment. We had signs and posters, and used daily verbal reminders about the kind of social and learning environment we wanted students to create and support.

I read with interest a few years ago about Fundamentalist Baptist Christians in Southern U.S. States that were pushing to have the Hebrew (Jewish) Ten Commandments of Moses placed on posters in every public elementary school (K-8) classroom. I seriously doubt that telling a third grade student not to commit adultery, not to covet their neighbor’s wife or property, not to kill, and to worship only the Hebrew deity Yahweh is very meaningful or relevant to them, or beneficial in improving elementary scool classroom behaviors.

In our public school, we emphasized core values every day: Responsibility, Integrity, Safety and Courtesy.

Here are examples from three posters in our library and classrooms:

Self Respect

S Set Goals
E Exercise
L Love Yourself
F Focus on Fitness

R Rest and Relax
E Eat Right
S Smile
P Portray the Positive
E Enjoy Life
C Care for Others
T Tell Yourself “You Can Do This”

Good People Skills

Smile
Use Good Manners
Acknowledge Others
Use Greetings
Use People’s Names
Look at People When Talking
Listen
Accept Differences
Respect the Opinions of Others
Give Compliments